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REPORT 



OF THE 



Charity Hospital 



OF LOUISIANA 
A T NEW ORLEANS 



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JUlV 1S1 - 1941 * W 30th, 1942 



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Main Building 1939 



BOARD OF ADMINISTRATORS 
Year Closing June 30th, 1942 



His Excellency Governor Sam H. Jones, Ex-Officio President 

Douglas V. Freret, Vice-President 

J\^ lAS A - Harwell Louis G. Riecke 

...» ( ai-colm L. .Monroe Walker Saussy 

^>'h w. Montgomery Fred S. Weis 

Wm. D. Phillips, M. D. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Fred S. Weis, Chairman 
Chas, A. Farwell Malcolm L. Monroe 

Joseph W. Montgomery 



MEDICAL COMMITTEE 
Dr. W. D. Phillips, Chairman 
Chas A. Farwell Walker Saussy 



HOUSE COMMITTEE 

Louis G. Riecke, Chairman 
Malcolm L. Monroe Walker Saussy 



* °'nted August 4th, 1941 



Fred W. Matthews 
Secrefary-Treatnirer of the Board 



— in — 



jform of <&tft or Jkquesrt 

I jjive to the Board of Administrators of the Charity Hosj 
of Louisiana at New Orleans the sum of 

FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS 
to be added to the Children's Bed Endowment Fund. 



Full Name 
Date 

Address 



Resolution unanimously adopted by the Board of Adminj 
tors at meeting of June 22nd, 1942: 

WHEREAS, The care and comfort of the little afflicted 
drcn often times requires some form of amusement, entertainmei 
special services, not otherwise provided for, 

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, That a fund be e 
lished whereby gifts or bequests to this fund to be designated a: 
Children's lied Endowment Fund be accepted upon the folic 
conditions, to-wit: That the principal be set aside unimpaire 
perpetuity, and same be invested in high grade securities, anc 
income i herefrom be dedicated and used exclusively for the care 
comfort of the afflicted children receiving treatment in this hos 
Furthermore, a suitable tablet be placed in the Children's Ward, 
the name of the donor and date of gift inscribed thereon. 

— iv — 















Bed "ENDOWMENT FUND" 




Memorial Bed 


Memorial Bed 






Endowed By 
A DELE EMILY ROESSLE 


Endowed By 
JOHN FLEMING 






New Orleans 


New Orleans 






1926 


1938 




Memorial Bed 


Memorial Bed 






Endowed By 


Endowed By 






MRS. P. A, CAPDAU 


•MRS, HATTIE McMARIUS 




New Orleans 


GAUDET 






1928 


Thibodaux, Louisiana 








1938 




Memorial Bed 


Memorial Bed 






Endowed By 


Endowed By 






LIONS' CLUB 
New Orleans 


BERNARD GEO, HOLSCHER 
New Orleans 






1929 


1938 




Memorial Bed 


Memorial Bed 






Endowed By 


Endowed By 






DR. J. A. HARDIN 


MRS, YYETTE ARON 






Chicago, Illinois 


New Orleans 






1930 


1938 












Memorial Bed 


Memorial Bed 






Endowed By 


Endowed By 






ALLEN J. ELLENDER, Jk. 


MISS MARIE ANTOINETTE 






Houma, Louisiana 


BERNARD de MONTIER 






1934 


New Orleans 


5 tb< 






1988 


Memorial Bed 






Endowed By 


< 




«RS. MOLLIE MORGAN HORN 
New Orleans 






1936 




- 








Memorial Bed 






Endowed By 






GEORGE M. READ 






Slide!!, Louisiana 








1936 





Jform of #itt or PequeSt 

■■■ ■ 

1 -'■■■'■ to the Board oi Administrators of the Charity H' 
of Louisiana at \™ Orleans the ran 

FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS 
added to the Children's Bed Kndowmem Fund. 



Full \ 






Address 

Resolution unanimously adopted by the Board of Adniin lStf 
tori »t mc i, tmi . 21u,\, 1942: 

UIU klA> ad comfort <.f the little afflict^ 

dna ■" require* tome form of amusement, entertains 

provided for, 

>REi BE IT RESOLVED, That a fund be 

tfcil tun. 
* Fund be acce, „ the h 

"■" i1 " 1 •* P^pal be so, aside unimpai^* 
*ed h high grade securities 
mc,,mc Aerd md and uaed exclusively I 

ranted children receiving treatment in tl 
FU " l«ced in the Children's Wa 

*■ """ Rift inscribed the, 



— Iv- 



Bed "ENDOWMENT FUND' 



Memorial Bed 
, Endowed By 

UE LE EMILY ROESSLE 
New Orleans 
192G 



Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

MR S. p, a. CAPDAU 

New Orleans 

1928 



Memorial Bed 
Endowed By 

LIONS' CLUB 

New Orleans 

1929 



Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

D J- J- A. HARDIN 

1 hicago, Illinois 

1930 



Memorial Bed 

l10 «»na, Louisiana 
1934 



Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

JOHN FLEMING 

New Orleans 

1938 



Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

MRS. HATTIE McMARIUS 

GAUDET 

Thibodaux, Louisiana 

1938 

Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

BERNARD GEO. HOLSCHER 

New Orleans 

1938 



Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

MRS. YVETTE ARON 

New Orleans 

1938 



Memorial Bed 

u,„ Kn dowed By 

*°LU E MORGAN 

Ne * Orleans 

1936 



HORN 



Memorial Bed 

CPrf t T dt>Wed By 

^RGEM.READ 

8U *>«. Lo u i s i ana 

1936 



Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

MISS MARIE ANTOINETTE 

BERNARD de MONTIER 

New Orleans 

L938 



HOSPITAL DEPARTMENTAL STAFFS 
Year Closing June 30th, 1942 



ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Oliver P. Dai.y, M. I)., Director 
n. v. Pbejean, M. D. 1 

P. J, Thomas, M. D. \ Assistant Clinical Directors 
L. J. O'Neil, M. D. J 
\V\i. A. Dykes, Executive Secretary to Director, Resigned Fei>, ,. 



PATHOLOGICAL LABORATORIES 

Emma S. Moss, M. D., Director, Department of Pathology 

Maurice M, Rice, M. D„ Assistant Pathologist 

Emu, Palik, M. D., Assistant Pathologist 

George P. Fasting. M. D„ Bacteriologist 



X.RAY, RADIUM AND DEEP THERAPY DEPARTMENTS 
Leon J. MENVILLE, M. D„ Director arid Radiologist 
Manuel Garcia. M. D., Associate Radiologist 
E. II, BitniK, M. D„ Associate Radiologist, Resigned Oct. l'JIl 
v MattinglY, M. D., Assistant Radiolon: 
.James R. RiLBY, M, D., Junior Assistant in Radiology, 1 \ 

Haiiky Kishhein, M. D., Third Year Resident in Radiology, Aujt. 1 
Assistant Radiologist 
O. M. Rii.ky. M. D., Second Year Resident in Radiology 
.1. Hopkins, M. D„ First Year Resident in Radiology 
MarJORIE FRANZ, M. D., Intern in Radiology 



HEART STATION 
ELECTROCARDIOGRAPH LABORATORY 

Richard Ashman, Ph. D., Director 
James L. Gouaux, M. D., Assistant Director 



PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 

Mrs. Marion B, Stewart, B.S.; R.P.T.T., Supervisor 



ANCITHktlA OWABTMSNT 

.1 m iv A i irian I, M. D., Director 



DEPARTMENTAL STAFFS— Continued 



SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 
Uvi-a Richasds, appointed Acting Director, Resigned Dec. i, 1941 
Miss Louise Meyer, Director, December 1, 1941. 



MEDICAL RECORDS LIBRARY 
ELIZABETH K. Greenwald, Director, Resigned Dec. 11, 1941 
Mrs. Shelby McCaffrey, Acting- Librarian 
Mrs. Eddie Cooksby, Acting Librarian (dink Record Rooms) 



SISTERS* DIVISIONS 

Sister Stanislaus, Director 
Sister Matiiilde, Assistant Director 



NURSING DEPARTMENT 

Sistbb Henrietta, R. N., Director of School of Nursing 

and Nursing Service 

Sister Paula, R. N., Director of Operating and 

Emergency Departments 

Sister Icnatia, R. N., Director of Out-Patient Department 



DIETARY DEPARTMENT 
Sister Euphemia, Director 



HOUSEKEEPING DEPARTMENT 
Sister Clarisse, Director 



ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

U\i v i ■ > ■■ ■ . .-in .< . .. j. i. ■:,,:,.■■ .,,< t j.,^ 

L A. Millet, Chief Accountant, Oetoher 1. 1941 



— vu — 



DEPARTMENTAL STAFFS— Continued 



PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 
Mrs. Virginia B. Waldo, Director, July 1, 1941 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

Herbert A. Ricks, Granted indefinite leave for service 
in United States Army July 20, 1942 



ALLERGIC CLINIC ON HAY FEVER 
N. F, Thiberge, M, D., Director 



OPERATING, ACCIDENT AND CYSTOSCOPY ROOMS 
Sister Paula 



PHARMACY 

Albert P. Lauve, Pharmacist 



ADMITTING DEPARTMENT 
Mrs. Marion Brunsan 



TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT 
Sidney P. Harper, Manager 



LAUNDRY DEPARTMENT 

John P. Felker, Manager 



MECHANICAL DIVISION 

G. S. Crawford, Plant Engineer, appointed March 16, 19 

J. V. Ponder, Chief Operating Engineer 
L. BENDI.ER, Superintendent of Buildings, Grounds, Const? 
and Maintenance 
Andrew J. JtAMEtii, Assistant to Supt. of Buildings 

— viii — 



CHARITY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 
July 1, 1941 — June 30, 1942 



L8.U. Unit MEDICINE 

MHATH, Jr„M.D.— 3rd year 
J- E. Gakcia, M. D.— 3rd Year 
B- A. Goldman, M. D.— 3rd Year 
; W. Horn. MD.--.3rd Year (Military Leave 7/8/41) 

SS-DUStaftU"" ,Af,pointed *> « 8i <W 8/1/41) 
Paooi, M. D,— 2nd Year 
K, Gordon, M. D.— 1st Year 
L HKrl N ^^ :V r; D -7- 1 ^ Year < Military Leave 9/1/41) 

SSaftSdSSiY transferred to Surgery i/1/42) 
>f!TKR. M. D._ 1st Year 
: Aptkr, M. D.— 1st Year 
Tulane Unit 

GORDON, M. D.— 3rd Year 
foSEPH, M. D.— 3rd Year 

*• t. St, Martin. M. D.— 3rd Year 

IJeuter. M. D.— 2nd Year (Military Leave 9/8/4 n 

:i White, M. D.— 1st Year 

KVVharton.M.D— 1st Year (Military Leave 4/20/42) 

r^MAN.M.D.-lstYear (SSUiiA «*SU. Physician 

KVKdttr (Military Left¥e 3/1/42) 

: . £ !'"'■! )■:, U. P.— lat Year 

' WOODBBTOGE, M. D.— 1st Year 
'"dependent Unit 
L E. Rausch. M. D. — 2nd Year 

> F. Samson, M. p.— 1st Year (Military Leave 10/29/41) 
J. M. Cleveland, M. I). -1st Year iu/«/«j 

: I IS M n~\ S t l C&r < Milita T Leave 4/11/42) 

S^'u/f/Wr (Transferre d to Dermatology and Syphil- 

J- B. Johnston, Jr., M. D._lst Year 

L8.U. unit PEDIATRICS 

wren M. Q titty, M. D.— 2nd Year 
iamson, M. D.— 2nd Year 
i . M. D._ lat Year 
W Spsck, M. D.— 1st Year (Resigned 3/1/42) 
Tutane Unit 

J. A. Weaver, M. D.— 2nd Year 
Bufora, M. D.— 1st Year 
Independent Unit 

"kar.M. D.— 2nd Year 
v Key, M. D.— 1st Year 



RESIDENT STAFF— Continued 



OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OTO-RHINO-LARYNGOLOGY 
L.S.U. Unit 

N. L. Hart, M. D.— 3rd Year (Military Leave 5/1/42) 

J. T. Simmons, M. D.— 3rd Year (Military Leave 5/15/42) 

R, E. Gardner, M. D. -2nd Year (Resigned 1/1/42) 

F. W, Ragcio. M. D.— 2nd Year 

G, Joseph, 11. D, — 1st Year 

F, M. LaOTKA, M. D.— 1st Year 

Tulare Unit 

W. Finkei.stein, M. D.— 3rd Year (Military Leave, 10/20/41) 
I.. S. Gamble, M. D,— 3rd Year 
C. P. Smith, M. D.- 2nd Year 

G. M. Tulloch, M. D.— 1st Year (Appointed to Residency 11/1/41) 
P. C. Caldwell, M. D.— 1st Year (Military Leave 9/15/41) 

R. Fox, M. D.— 1st Year (Military Leave 4/1/42) 

N. Callahan, M. D.— 1st Year (Military Leave 9/15 11 1 

L. A. Wilensky, M. D, — 1st Year (Appointed to Residency 10/6/41) 

Independent Unit 

I.. W, (). JAN-BSBN, Jr., M. D.— 2nd Year (Resigned 12/25/41) 

C. KiappeR, M. D.— 2nd Year 

II. M. Abler, M. D.— 1st Year 



UROLOGY 
L.S.U. Unit 

G. W. Vickery, M. D.— 3rd Year (Military Leave 5/1/42) 
P. L. GETZOIT, It 1!.— 2nd Year 
J. P. Burton, M. D,— 1st Year 

Tulane Unit 

E. [•-, Kelly, M. D.— 3rd Year (Military Leave 10/20/41) 
M. Sii.vky, M. [).— 3rd Year 

\. B. POWB i . M. D.— 2nd Year (Resigned 6/1/42) 
J. D. Mitchell, M. D. — 1st Year 

Independent Unit 

.1. V. Lally, Jr., M. D,— 1st Year (Appointed to residency 

fcary Leave 4/14/42) 
J, M. WILLIAMS, JR., M, ]>.'— 1st Year (Leave of Absence 10/14/41) 
l>. W. Atciikson, M. D. — 2nd Year 



RADIOLOGY 

(All Units) 

II. FiSBBON, M. D.— 3rd Year (Promoted to Assistant Radiologist K 
(i. M. Riley. !nd Year 

J. V. Hoi-kins, M. D— 1st Year 



RESIDENT STAFF— Continued 



PATHOLOGY 
(All Units) 
■-zzi.lato, M. D.— 2nd Year 

W R &*' V ' ^ D T ;- lst Year < Resigned 3/20/42) 
*. R. Rosanoff. M. D._ 1st Year (Resigned 2/28/42) 



DENTISTRY 

(All Units) 



tpSlSVh'qVW'" 1 .* Residency 6/1/42) 

&£l?42t ' ' °- < A PP°' nted 7/15/41— Military Leave 



' ADMITTING PHYSICIANS 
*TB M NNON) M. D, (Appointed 1/16/42) 
"wSSS^ Appointed 8/1/41-Military Leave 9/2/41) 
UU.Y, &.D. (Transferred to Urology 10/16/41) 
*. L^THERMAN, M D. (Appointed 8/l^l-Mi!itarv Leave 3/7/42) 
X Ww? 'ffrT^SS^ to Obstetrics and GyneXgy 8/1/41) 
J PwT ?. n •,,,'• ' Militm-y Leave 9/21/41) "■'+>■> 

W , Nabos, M. I). ( Military Leave 9/6/41) 

*M?S J M ri ^ p n p0i ! ,, f!, 8/ o 1 ^- MiIit * i y I*»« 1/15/42) 

;• R. Ti-rgeok, M. D. (Re.ipned 3/7/42 ) ' 

W atkins, M. D. (Appointed 3/8/42) 



— xm — 



CHARITY HOSPITAL INTERNE STAFF 
July 1, 1941— June 30, 1942 



JUNIOR INTERNS 



James Speros Andres, M. IV 

Joel Jordan Arrendale, M. D. 
'Donald Joseph Baranco, M. D. 

Fran?, Karl Batter, M. D. 
'John William Birsner, M. D. 

Leslie M, Bodnar, M. D. 

Julian Eugene Boggess, M. D. 
'JIarlin Talmadge BrasweB, -M. D. 
•Lazard Samuel Brener, M. D, 

William Craig I M. D, 

Walter Brodie Burwell, M. D. 

Louis Kay Cabiran, M, D 
'Dionieua Vincent Cacioppo, M. D. 

Prank Arbuthnot Cain, M. D, 

Martial fi. Casteix, Jr„ M. D. 

Stephen A. Chavez, M. D. 

Vincent Francis Chicola, M. I). 

Paul M. Consifjny, M. D. 
; nan Cottar, at. D. 
a Scott Chercdes, M. D, 

Oscar Creech, Jr., M, D. 

David Ausmus Davis, M. D. 

Julius Theodore Davis, Jr., M, D. 

Thomas Malcolm Deas, M. D. 

Joseph Bell Deisher, Jr., M. D. 

usto deMier, M. D. 
'Nathan Carter Denton, Jr., M. D. 

n Richard Depp, M. D. 
'Samuel John Dil,eo, M. D, 

Joseph New tii ii Dills, M, IV 
1 Michael Joseph Donahue, Jr., M. D. 

Millard n. Duxbury, .M. D, 

Clay Elliott Easterly. M. D. 

Louis Albert Ensenat, M. D. 
• n Austin Kn/.or, M. D. 

'Joseph A. Farris, M. D. 

Jacob levy Pischman, M. D. 

James Brierton Flanagan, M. D. 

Robert Emerson Florer, M. D. 

Ruffln Daniel Fornea, M. D. 
'Jack Russell Frank, M. D. 
orge Qaetbe, M. D. 

Robert Karl Gillaspie. M, D. 

.Michael Nahman Goldberg, M. D. 
■Henry Herman Goldsby. Jr., M. D, 
' Frederick Clearly Grieshaber, 
M. D. 



Carl Joseph Gulotta, M. D. 
Rov James Grubbs, Jr., M. 1 1 
Violet G. P. Halfpenny, M. D. 
'Robert Henry Hansen, M. 1). 
Elmer Jacobs Harris, M. IV 
Andrew Cleve Heath, M. IV 
Hosah Sellers Holloway, Jr. 
Mariauna Hood, M. D. 
Winthrope R. Hubler, M. D. 
Richard I.e.- Hudson, M. 
.lames Harvey Johnston, Jr. 
HenryWilliam Jolly, Jr., M 
•Thomas Warren Klein fn 
Philip Paul LaNasa, M. 1). 
Paul Ho Hard La si 
' laiide Wilson Lavender 
Morton Levy, M. Iv 
'James Paul Leslie, M. D. 
'Bert Hunter Lewis, M. 1 V 
Clement Albert Litfhtcap, \ 
Early Barton Lokey, Jr., M 
John Wade Long, M. D. 
Edward Curry Love, Jr., M. D 
Richard .Henry Maddux. .1 1 
Conway Stone Magee, M. IV 
Francis Kugene Martin, M 
Frederick Alvyn Marx, M 
Jane Maysey Matthews. M 
John Calvin McLeod, Jr., V 
Robert James Meade, M. 1 1. 
Leonard Meltzer, M. D. 
Logan Underwood Mewhin 

M. D. 
Arthur VanBuren Miller, .1 

M. D. 
Clyde Ewing Miller, Jr., >, 
Stanley Earl Morgan, M. D, 
'Harry Stuart Morris, M. 1 1. 
Earl Herbert MorroRh. M. 
Ralph Robert Nix. M. D. 
Robert Branstrom Olney, M. I 
Daniel Thomas O'Quirti 
James Malcolm Packer, M 
Myron Lawson Pardee, M 
Julicn Carey Pate, Jr., \1 
Charles La, Thadwin Pent, 

M. D. 



'Began service 3/1/42. 
rned. 
nilitary Leave. 



— xiv — 



INTERNE STAFF— Continued 



JUNIOR INTERNS— Continued 



James Madison Pomcroy, M. D, 

-Alton Ray Fruit, M. D." 

Frederick Cooper Ron f eld t, M, D. 

Nell Reiley, M. II. 

-Arthur J. Richardson, Jr., M. D. 

Julian A. Rickles, M. D. 

Ed. Rjvet. Jr., M. D. 
^Sam Gwin Robhins, M. 1). 

Lewis Sleeper Robinson, Jr., M. D. 

Eugene Sullivant Rogers, M. I>. 

John Rene Romero, Jr., M. I). 

Robert Manser Rose, M. D. 
, Robert Russell Roth, M. D, 

William Ernest Rownd. M. I). 

Sam J. Russo, M. D. 
j Cornelia Plauche St. Romain, M, 1), 

Harold John Sabatier, M. D. 

Oscar Perdue Sanders, Jr., M. D. 

'•avid Henry Scott, M. D. 

Jack Hamilton Seott, M. D. 
I .^Robert Melvin Shepard, Jr., M. I). 

Prances Reynolds Sherman, M. D. 

Charles Robert Sias, M. D. 

Cecil Lowry Sinclair, M. n. 

Gardner Ford Smart, M. D. 

James L. Smith, M. D, 

Elbert Joque Soskis, M. D, 

wetchen Vitter Squires, M. D. 



Orville Patton Stone, M. D. 
'Keith Alfred Stratford, M. I). 

Byron McClellan Stuart, M. I). 
'Alma Marie Sullivan, M. D. 

James Mack Sutton, Jr., M. D, 

Theodore Francis Treutinjr, M. D. 
'James Alexander Thorn III, M. D, 

Philip Cocke Trout, M. D. 

Alcenith Boyden Vcith, M. D. 

Arthur Jemison Wallace, Jr., M. I>. 

Jim Roy Warden, M. D. 

Robert Moore Waters, M. D. 
-Clyde Ater Watkins, M. D. 

Stephen Lawton Watson, M. I). 

Richard Hunt Weddle, M. D. 

Julius Jakle Weinberg, M. D. 

Harold Augustus White, M. D. 

Celt ne Wichser, M. D. 

Eugene Henry Wicker, M. P. 

Arthur Grady Williams, Jr., M. D. 

Ruth Winston, M. D. 

Charles Johnson Wise, M. D. 

Jerry Philip Woodhall, M. D. 

Norman Cooper Woody, Jr., M. D. 

Thomas Julian Wright, M. D. 

Thomas Laclede Young, M. D. 
'Thomas Leonard Young, M. D. 
BEdward Stanley Zawaddd, M. D. 



INTERN IN RADIOLOGY 

-Marjorie Frantz, M. D. 



INTERN IN TUBERCULOSIS 
-Philip Alcide Robichaux, M. I). 



INTERNS IN DENTISTRY 

'Julius R. Bourgovne, D. D. S. 

"Edward Cutrer, D. D. S.— Appointed 8/9/41 

"T. A. UelPapa, D. D. S.— Appointed 1/24 42 

oj. M. R. Matta, D. D. S.— Appointed 3/7/42 

Harry F. Pierce, Jr., D. D, S.— Appointed 10/15/41 



(feejran service 3/1/42. 
rjBflfcan service i 1/42. 

i Completed service 11/15/41 and promoted to Senior Intern, 
promoted to residency. 
.Ceave of absence. 
I Resigned. 
On military leave. 



INTERNE STAFF— Continued 



SENIOR INTERNS 



3 Prank Joseph Bertueci, M. D. 
• William Tappan Brannon, M. D. 
"Edgar Paul Breaux, Jr., M. D. 
■'Luther Putnsim Crnll, -M. D. 
"Richard John Dach, M. D. 
i Glenn M. Dalbey, M. D. 
:i James Andrew LI kins, M. D. 
*Ned Wilson Holland. M. D. 
*Glen Iden Holmes, M. D, 
'John A. Kirch nor, M. D. 
'Raymond Earl Lovett, M. D. 
KJik-in Finley Meadors, Jr., M, D. 



••William Joseph Oldham, M. 1'. 
Thomas Jertry Saflcy, Jr., M. 1 
^George M. Tulloch, M. D. 
'William E. Wellman, M. D. 
:i William Benjamin Wiener, M. 
3 Louis A. Wilensky. M. 1'. 

I Began service 8/17/41) 
-Felix Jefferson Willey, M D 
■•Clyde A. Watkins. M. D. 

(Began service 1X/16/41) 
"Robert Cary Wood, M. D. 
sWilliam Zink, M. D. 



'Resigned. 

'-'On Military Leave. 

"Promoted to Residency, 

••l'mmoted to Admitting Physician. 
■Leave of Absence— U.S. P. ft, S. 



— xvi — 



CHARITY HOSPITAL VISITING STAFF 

July 1, 1941 — June 30, 1942 

Medicine and the Medical Specialties 



L J. DVBOB, M. I). 



0. W. Bethea, M, I). 
M. Campagna, M. D. 

i,. M. D. 
Giles, M.D. 
Bsninoeb, M. D 
Hobson, M. I), 
. Iln i.. M. I). 
bs, M. D. 
• I- LOCASCIO, M. D. 



GENERAL MEDICINE 
Consulting Physicians 

A. E. FOSSJBB, St D. 

S. C. JAMISON, M. D. 

Senior Visiting Physicians 

W. A. Love, M, D, 
'M. W. Miller, M. D. 

l. A. Monte, M. d. 

J. H. Musser, M. D. 

I . L. Robbins, M. D. 

J. H. Smith, Jr., M. I) 

N. F, Thiberce, M. D. 

C. J. Tripoli, M. D. 
» rt ™ aR - H - Turner, M. D. 

J. O. Weilbaecher, Jr., M. D. 



J - J- Archinarp, M. D. 

; : ■ ". BAYU5V, M. D. 

Kobert Bernhard, M. D. 
E. A. Bertucci, M. D. 
Iii.IT/,. 81 D. 
Botch, M, D. 
L- A. Caboche, M. D. 

I UTONI, M. D. 
ICKEN8, M. I>. 
' I IBDBEBG, M. D. 

J. H. Glu.ENTINE, M. D. 

Goldsmith, M. 1). 
'v Jacobs, M. D. 
lDctb, m. r>. 



Visiting Physicians 

J. D. Landry, M. D. 
-L. K. Levy, M. D. 
J. A. Lewis, M. D. 

D. V, Longo, M. n. 
R, C. Lowe, M. D. 

E. deS. Matthews, M. D. 
Geo. R. Meneely, M. D 

*LOBIS Oi'HS, M, |i. 
P. L. Querens, M. D. 
H. H. Russell, M. D. 
L. C. Scott, M. D. 
Morris Shushan, M. D. 
I). X. Silverman, M. D. 
W. A. Sodeman, M. D. 
J- L. Wilson, M, D. 



Assistant Visiting Physicians 
B, M. D. 
O, A ken head, M. D, 
\k. M. D. 



t Bruno, M. D. 

ikn', M. D. 
J. Derbes, M. D. 
■ y. M. I). 

;:'>», M. D. 

hardt, M. D. 
Farrei.1.. M. D. 
J- Foret. M. D. 
BBBH, M. D, 

! DBTBIN, M. D. 

N, M. I). 

■ K, M. t» 



Alice Baker Holoubek. M D 

R. A. Katz, M. U. 
•J. D. Lea, M. D. 

C. M. Mirikitani, M. D. 
■R. S. Munger, M. D. 

E. B. Nix, M. D. 
-A. T. Ogaard, M. D 

Henry D. Ocden, M. D. 

R. M. Shushan, M. D. 

N. W. Voorhies, M. D 
J. W. Wells, M. I), 

C. J. WlLEN, M. D. 

] H. P, Williams, M. D 

W. H. WlNDI.EY, M. D 

Travis Winsor, M. D 



ry l,eave. 



■ XVII — 



VISITING STAFF— Continued 



PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 

Senior Visiting Physician 

G. W. McCoy, M. D. 

Parasitologist 

J. C. SWARTZWELDER, Ph. D. 



DERMATOLOGY AND SVPHILOLOGY 
Senior Visiting Physicians 
Ralph Hopkins, M. D. J. K. Howles, M. D. 

M. T. Van Studdiforp, M. D. 

Visiting Physicians 

C. B. Kennedy, M. D, 

Assistant Visiting Physicians 

A. J. Itauano, M. D. Mannie Mallowitz, M. D. 

G. M. Leiby, M. D. E. R. Cockerell, M. D. 



W. J. Otis, M. D. 
G. P. Robling, M. D. 



L. A, Golden, M. I). 
('. 1*. May, M, L). 
W. J. Rein, M. 1). 



V.. M. SKJ1SEI-, M. [). 



NEUROPSYCHIATRY 

Senior Visiting Physicians 

H. R. Unsworth, M. D. 
T. A. Waiters, M. D. 

Visiting Physicians 

John Skocland, M. D. 
J. Beryl Sumerfield, M. O 
Walker Thompson, M. D, 
Erwin Wexberg, M. D. 

Assistant Visiting Physicians 

T. L. L, Soniat, M. D, 



{'.. J. Bijiom, M. I). 

Maud Loeber, m.*d, 



PEDIATRICS 
Senior Visiting Physicians 

Suzanne Schaefer, M. D. 
C. A. Stewart, M. D. 
-R. A. Strong, M. D. 

Visiting Physician* 
i; d. Aleman, M. D, .Kuan Graubarth, M. I>. 

Ren a Crawford, M, D. E, L, i.kveht, U, D, 

-•W. J. Crawford, M. D. E. P. Naef, M. D. 

R. E. I>k i a HODSSAYB, M. H. W. C. RlVENBARK, M. D. 

P. C. Dk Verge*. M. I». H, B. Rothschild, M. D. 

WlEKIIII.I, W. EVERHART, M. D. J. E. STRANGE, M, D. 

G. R. Williamson, SI D. 



-Military Leave. 



— xvm — 



VISITING STAFF— Continued 



PEDIATRICS— Continued 
Assistant Visiting Physicians 
Alice M. C. Tisdale, M. D. J. D, Russ, M. D. 

H. P. Marks, Jr., M. D. ir. P. Veith, M, D 

Wallace Sako, m. d. Emma Wharton, M. D. 

Bertha Wexler, M. D, 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Senior Visiting Physician 

N. H. Poi.MER, M. D. 



Surgery and the Surgical Specialties 

GENERAL SURGERY 



J. M. Batchxlob, M. D, 
•MinsBrauburk, M. D. 



G. C. Anderson, M, D. 
Emile Block, M. D. 

R. Brewster, M. D. 

'. Cassegrain, M. D, 
I- . L. Cati), M. D, 

ink Chetta, M. D, 

- COLE, M. I). 
E Cohn, M. D. 
'1. J. Christman, M. D. 
J. rt. Oanna, M. D. 
'. M. Gage, M. D. 
Uava, M. D. 
E. L Irwin, M. D. 

•'-<;. i.Aiiiuix, m. j >. 
BL Landry, m. D. 



I' A. HllL'DREAUX, M. D. 
I''. F. BOYCE. .M.I). 

J. K. Briekre, M. I). 
Brown, M.- D. 

R. I.. Hick, M. I>. 
Charbonnet, Jr., 
Colclough, M. It. 

H. A. ruvis, M. D. 
E. DbBakby, m. D. 

D n. Echols, M. D. 

IKK, M. D. 

Hanckes, M. D. 

W. H. HUBERT, M. I). 



Consulting Surgeons 

W. P. Bradburn, Jr., M. D. 
Herman Gessner, M. D. 
Rudolph Matas, M. D. 

Senior Visiting Surgeons 

E. L. Leckert, M. D. 
Henry Leiuenheimer, M. I 
Joseph Levy, M. D. 
Urban Maes, M. D. 
C. W. Mattingley, M. D. 
Waldemar Metz, M, n. 

C. J. MlANGOLARRA, M. D. 

J. T, Nix, M. D. 
E. W. A. Ochsner, M. D. 
C, B. Odom, M. D. 
P. A. Phillips, M, n. 
l'. A. Planche, m. d. 

E, J. Richard, M, D. 
J. D. Rjves, M. D. 

-A. H. Storck, M. D. 
►R, W. Wright, M. D. 

Visiting Surgeons 

>D. Hyman, M. D. 
H, C. ILGEN'FRITZ, M. D. 
H. R. Kahi.e. M. D. 
I. W. Kaplan, M. D. 
Samuel Karlin, M. D. 
M, D. iC. H. Long, M. D. 

'J. L. Keki.ey, M. D. 
A. B. Longacre, M. D. 

F. L. Loria, M. D. 
H. R. Mahorner, M. D, 
W. D. Norman, M. D. 
J. F. Oak ley, M, D. 
Goy L. Odom, M. D. 



'Military Leave. 



— xix — 



VISITING STAFF— Continued 



GENERAL SURGERY— Continued 
Visiting Surgeons — Continued 

Neal Owens, M. 1). .1. F, Sicomo, M. D. 

R. M. Penick, Jr., M. D. '.I. K. Stone, M. D, 

A. M. Powe, M. D. L. H. Strug, M, D. 

Alberto Prieto, M. D. C. J. Tardo, M. D. 

S. A. IIiimami, M. I>. \v. C. Troeschek, M. D. 

S. B. Saiewitz, M. D. R. W. Vincent, M. D. 

N. Waul. M. D. 



Assistant Visiting Surgeons 



G, E. P. Barnes, M. D. 
T. T. Batson, M. D. 
.1 . M . Brocato, M, D. 

J. M. ClARAVELLA, M, D. 

L.C. DSLBBY. M D. 
Vincent* D'Iangianni, m. D. 

n, B. I'Attis, m. D. 

W, K. Gaothibs, M. D, 

li . I. Cii.ks, m. D. 



IT, T. Herring, M. D. 

P. M, Hindelanc, M. D. 

Bernard Hochfblder, M. 
'Amiot Joucoeur, M. D. 

M. L, MlCHBu, M. D. 

Reynold Patzer, M. D. 

w. H. Roeling, M. D. 

M. C. Smith, M. D. 

0. D. Thomas, M, D. 



J, A. Vella, M. D. 



Wilmek Bakki:. M. D 
M.C. Bacx, M. D, 



ANESTHESIA 
Senior Visiting Anesthetist 

A. M, t'AiNi:. M, li. 

Visiting Anesthetists 

L. L. Dismuke, M. D. 
G. B.Grant, M. D. 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 
Consulting Surgeons 
.!. S. aZBBCT, M. 1). W. D. PHILLIPS, M. D. 

H. W. Kostmayek, M. D. P. T. Talbot, M. I). 



D. Aim, Kit. M. I). 

ii ii. Alsobrook, M. I i 

P.J, Cabtbl M. li. 

.i. K. Dicks, m. D, 

A. ii. Gladden. M. I). 

p. K. GotUl I, Si(,,M, li. 

Pans Gbaftaonino, m. i». 



Senior Visiting Surgeons 

Ancu.i'H Jacobs, M, D. 
E. L. Kin-:. M. D, 
W. E. Levy, M. D. 
H. E. Miu.Ei;, M. D. 
T. B. Sellers, M. D. 
H. V. Sims, m. n. 
M. L Stadiem, M. D. 
k. ii. Waist, M. D. 



'Resigned. 
"Military Lenve. 



— xx — 



VISITING STAFF— Continued 



R. E. Arnell, M. I). 
W. f>. Beacham, M. D. 
. Bellone, m. D, 

H. G. BUTKBB, M. D. 

W. H. RVHNE. M. D. 

Cabibi, M. D. 
Arthur Caire, Jr., M. D. 
H r.. Cohen, M. D. 
G. Collins, M. D. 

Countiss, M. D. 
H. Cronan, M. D. 
Danna, m. D. 
'• D. Feldner, M. d. 
-J. S. Gborge, m. D. 
-Abe Golden. M. D. 
P. R. Giimiu, Jr., M. D. 
Guerbiero, M. D. 
Hardy, M. D. 
J - s. Herring, m. d. 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY— -Continued 
Visiting Surgeons 

3 Alfred Jacoby, M. D. 

C. G. Johnson, M. D. 
2 M. E. Lapham, M. D. 

J, E. Lindner, m. d. 

L. B. Lecgio, M. D. 

H. C. Magee, M. D. 

G. A. Mayer, M. D. 

Harry Meyer, M. D. 

R. E. Moor, M. D. 

J. W. Reuihk'h, M. D. 
-'R. E. Roucelot, M. D. 

E. C. Smith, M. D. 
>R. T. Stephenson. M. It. 

N. J. Tessitore, M. D. 

E. P. Thomas, M. D. 
C. H. Tyrone, M. D. 

F. K. Vaughan, M. D. 
-'J. S. Webb, Jr., M. D. 
8J, C. Weed, M. D. 

E, L. Zander, M. D. 
Assistant Visiting Surgeons 



i. Clavekje, M, D. 
P. F. Gambino, M. D. 
M. M. Hattaway. M. D. 
R- P. Phillips, m. D. 
J- C. Ragan, M. D. 



*M. P. Schwartzenbach, M. D. 
M. D. Steines, M. D, 
G. F. Sustendal, M. D. 
W. V. Treadwell, M. L) 
B. B. Weinstein, M. D. 



OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Consulting Surgeons 

W. u. ISuffincton, M. D. V. C. Smith, M. D. 

Senior Visiting Surgeons 

H, F. Brewster, M. D. 



1 A. Ruin. M. D. 
Blum, M. D 



F. T. Beatrous, M. D. 
Sam Bergman, M, D. 
W, M. Boles, M. D. 



Beil, M. D. 



rriL-il 

-Military L«ave. 

•tsed. 



W. B. Clark, M. D. 

T.J. Dimitry, M. I). 

Visiting Surgeons 

G, M. Haik, M. D. 
-P. L. Marks, M. D. 

M. C. WlLENSKY, M. D. 
Assistant Visiting Surgeons 

-'P. W. Renken, M. D. 



— XXI — 



VISITING STAFF— Continued 



C. L Brown. M. D. 
C. L. COX, .M. I). 
I:, H. FlSHBR, .M. II. 
V. H. Ferns, M. It. 
F. E. LeJeune, M, 1). 



J. B. (lom -it. M. Ii. 
•I. T PALERMO, M. I). 



Gavin, ii n. 



OTO-RHINOLARYNGOLOGY 

Senior Visiting Surgeons 

S. B. Mc-Nair, M. I). 
M. F. Meyer, M. D. 

J. KOELING HaNLEY, M, 

G. J. Taqujno, m. d. 
E. G, Walls, M. I). 

Visiting Surgeons 

D. A. PalMISaNO, M. I). 
-R. M. Street, M. D. 
H. A, Thomas, M. D, 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons 

S. R. Gaines, M. D. 



G. C. Battalora. M. 1). 



R. II. Alldhbdge, M, P. 
Frank Brostrom. m. i>. 
Irvin Cahen, M. l>. 



ORTHOPEDICS 
Senior Visiting Surgeons 

E. D. Fen nek, M. D. 
ii. T. Simon, M, D, 

Visiting Surgeons 

G. A. Caldwell, m. D. 

-F. J. Cox. M. D. 
E. H. Maureh, M. D. 
ii. n. Morris, M. d. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons 
D, M. KlNcsi.EV, M. D. 



p, i Cable, m. d. 
ii. .i. Lindner, m. D. 



UROLOGY 

Consulting Surgeon 
W. A, Reed, M. D, 

Senior Visiting Surgeons 

•I. G. Pratt, M. D. 

Monroe Wolk, M. n. 



II. T, Beac BAM, M, I i. 
Edoar Burns. .M. D. 
-I. .1 I to, M. D, 

M. M, Green, m. I'. 

W. K, KrTTREDOE, -III.. M. IV 

i k, McMillan, m. D. 



Visiting Surgeons 

R. J. Maxlhes, M. D. 

2 J. G. Mknvii.i*:. M. I 1 . 
llll.AlKK I). Ooden, M. D. 
R. F. Sharp, M. D. 

<:.<-. ToMSKY, M, D. 

E. B. Vickerv, M. I), 



Assistant Visiting Surgeons 

M. K. Fatter, M, D. 



-Military I.tavo. 



— xxii — 



VISITING STAFF— Continued 



PATHOLOGY 
Consulting Pathologists 

A, V. Fredrichs, M. D. 
W. H. Harris, Sr., M. D. 

Senior Visiting Pathologist 
H. J. SCHATTENBEHG, M. D. J. R. ScHENKEN, M. D, 

Visiting Pathologists 

H. P. Newbill, M. D. 
Bjarne Pearson, M. D. 
Joseph Stasney, M, D. 
Joseph Ziskind, M. D, 

As«istant Visiting Pathologists 

W. M. McCOHD, M. D. 
"■ Ernest Stark, M. D, 

Visiting Bacteriologist 
K. L. BuRDON, Ph. D. 



C, W. Duval, M. D. 



Bi bns, M. D. 

V K. Casev, M, D. 
Halpert, M. D 



Bachis, .m. D. 

W. H. Harris, .Jr.. M 



'• Bliss, Ph. D. 



SCIENTISTS 

H, A. Senejie, M, D. 



. D. D. S. 

•I K.MAN. D. D, S. 
1 II. DUCABSE, D. It. S 

NiCAUii, D. 1). S 



BTl i I). D. S 

P.J. Booth, d. d. S. 

ii ■ . D. D. S. 

n. d. s, 

IBBOUCHEL, Ii. I). S. 
B. MiiKZ, IX D, S. 

: 1KIN. I>. D. S. 

DRINGTON, n.D, S. 

•i . Facet, D. D. S 
)l. E. Fooiman, D. D. S. 
i. D. D. S. 
Fransen, D. D. S. 

<;. i'rh'k, d. d. s. 

■ GonciN, I). I). S. 
Gbeenblatt, D. D. S. 

f, d. n. s. 

»0. C. KiuEr.KR, D. D. S. 

•iied. 
-.Military Leave. 



DENTAL SURGERY 

Consulting Dental Surgeon 

C. P. KELLEHER, D. D. S. 

Senior Visiting Dental Surgeons 

S. L. Tibuer, D. D. S. 
Visiting Dental Surgeons 

G. 0. Kosado, D. D. S. 
P. B. Salatich, D. D. S. 
A. D. Smith, D. D. S. 
Assistant Visiting Dental Surgeons 



M. H. Laufer. D. D. S, 
W. A. Lazarus, D. D. S. 
A. N. Levata, D. D. S. 
-J. G. Mallory, D. D. S. 
J. E, Mathes, D. D. S. 
R. C. Neeb, D. D, S. 

D. I- Petersen, D. D. S. 
H. W. Peterson, D, D. S. 
J. L. Piazza, D. D. S. 
Ethel Prima, D. D. S. 

V. A. a. Robinson, D. D. S. 

WlLBERT SCHEFFLER, D. D. S. 

J. P. Schiro, D. D. S. 
"H. F. Smith, D. D. S. 

E. B. Williams, D. D. S. 
"F. J. Wolfe, Jr., D. D. S. 
-H. s. Zimmerman, D. D. s. 



— xxm ■ — 



24 CHARITY HOSPITAI 1941-1942 



BIENNIAL REPORT OF THE VICE-PRESIDENT 
Period July 1st, 1941 to June 30th, 1942 

His Excellency, Sam H. Jones, 

he State of Louisiana and 
Ex-Officio President of the 
Board of Administrators of the Charity 
Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans, Louisiana. 

The Board of Administrators of the Charity Hospital of Lou 
at New Orleans, Louisiana, herewith submits a report of its act; 
for the period July 1st, 1941 to June 30th, 1942. 

A short time after your Excellency was inaugurated, you appi 
as members of the Board of Administrators of the Charity II 
Louisiana at New Orleans, La,: 

Douglass V. F re ret, 
Malcolm L, Monroe, 
Louis (J, Riecke, 
Walker Saussy, 
Fred S. Weis 

lea I. Rivet and Dr. William D. Phillips, who had previously . 
on the Board, continued as members. 

\1 the first meeting of the new Board of Administrators -.,- 
reconstituted, Douglass Frerct was elected Vice-President and on 
officer. 

Dr. Roy W. Wright, who was Director at the ineipiencv of tin- 
nf this report, resigned as Director of the Hospital on December 17 
and Dr. J. (). Weilbaeher and Dr. Charles B. Odom were elected I 
Hoard i" act jointly as Acting Directors of the Hospital. Dr. t) 
was appointed Director on March 1, 1941 and Drs. Wcilbaeher and 

inued to serve as Acting Directors until June 30th, MM I. I 
date Mrs. 0. V. Prejean, P. J. Thomas and L. J. O'Neil were eh<> 
Assistant Clinical Directors. Dr. Prejean resigned on the 30th , 
June, 1942. 

I. 

Shortly after the new Board assumed their responsibilities, th 
partmeut of Radiology was reorganized and Dr. Leon J. MenvilU 
sleeted part lime Director of this Department. 

Similarly the Me partment of Pathology was reorganized and D 
Emm;i 8, Moss was chosen Director of this Department. 

And, furthermore the Department of Anesthesia was reorgj 
and Dr. John Adriani was elected Director of this Department. 

A Health 1'nit to take care of subsidiary employees of the 11 
was established by the Board. This filled a long felt want. 

Hy request of Oovernor Jones on Aug. 11, 1940, thirty do, 
sent from this institution to the southwestern part of the Stale for 
work during the flood. 

A few months after the appointment of these new members I 
Board, the Hoard received Executive Order No. 8(d) ot DM", 
February 88, 1941, which placed in full effect the transfer of Ui", 
agenu-m of certain state agencies— including Charity Hospital of I 5 



VICE-PRESIDENT'S REPORT 25 



'*"* at New Orleans, to the Department of Institutions. Appointments 
t medical staff and management of trust funds and legacies were, ac- 
cording to this order, left as a function of the Board of Administrators, 
but the power of the Board in substantially all other matters was to be 
merely of an advisory nature, 

II. 
The system of paying a large number of employees in cash, which 
had previously prevailed, was abolished, and in lieu thereof all payments 
were thereafter made by check signed by the Treasurer. An aceountinK 
ion separate from the Treasurer's office was established and the 
duties pertaining thereto were defined. A uniform system of hospital 
accountinj; was installed, and a further system for a perpetual inventory 
was established. Under this system of records of financial proceedings 
entirely different figures were available from those in previous years. 
A complete audit by the Supervisor of Public Accounts covering the 
Hospital's receipts and disbursements from July 1st, 1940 to June 30th, 
42, including a detailed examination of all Special Funds derived from 
sources other than appropriations by the State from the inception of each 
has been completed and copies thereof have been sent to your 
v and to the Department of Institutions. 
The salaries of low bracket employees throughout the Institution 
nave been carefully scrutinized by the Board and equalization and stan- 
dardization of all such compensation has been established at a higher 
rate with a minimum of a fair living wage. 

'n the 1st day of July, 1940 the salaries of senior internes were 
fawed from $10 to $15 per month. 

The placing of all insurance on properties of Charity Hospital of 
tana at New Orleans (except Trust Fund Building's! was taken 
by tin- Department of Finance, Insurance Section, at Baton Rouse 
l-ouisiana. 

During the period July 1st. !9fG through June 30th, 1942, the sum 
I80S.754.26 was transferred from the Bond Liquidation Account to the 
ral Operating Funds, and $10,210.73 was expended out of the Oon- 
Kunei (La. 4529-D.P.W.A.) for instruments and renovati 
the income of Trust Funds under the control of the Board of Ad- 
ministrators a total of $9I,9R6.68 was expended for new equipment, 
renovations, etc. 

Applegate Legacy— $10,000.00 — designated to the Tuberculosis 
harity Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans was set a 
■ Hoard to purchase X-Ray Equipment for the Colored Tuberco 
but owing to war conditions the purchase of this equipment 
wtponed. Meantime the fund was invested temporarily in United States 
Bonds. 

i A. P. Sehiro for the building Nos. 1016-1022 Canal Street 
McHurney Property) on the basis of $20,000.00 rent per annum from 
■ 1st. 1942 for a period of twenty years was executed as a 
I adjustment of a prior lease for $16,000 per annum. 

III. 

press has been made by the Board of Administrators 

to what might be termed medical matters pertaining to 
Boapital. 

The puhiv regarding persons who are injured and brought to the 

tal in cases where their expenses are covered by compensation in- 

aurance has been considerably revised. Onlv emergency cases in the 

future are to lie admitted to the hospital, and in such cases, as soon as 



26 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 



the condition of the patients permit, they are transferred to privs: 
hospitals. All insurance companies writing compensation insurance i 
tin* State of Louisiana have been notified of this change in polit 
have been informed that it is the desire of the Board of Adminis 
that all such cases be referred to private hospitals, wherever pi 

A change has been made, however, in the services rendt- 
Charity Hospital ambulances; it beinjr well understood that < 
Hospital ambulances may be used to transmit all such patients as 
above described to private hospitals when so requested. 

The unit record system — i.e., a system whereby all clinical ant! 
records pertaining to any individual patient should be unitix.. 
been inaugurated in the medical records library. It is contemplate 
this system will save a great deal of time and confusion in the tre;. 
of any patient who may return to the clinic or the ward after 
received treatment at some previous occasion. 

New employees must now pass a physical examination in the Hea 
Unit of Charity Hospital before being employed. 

A general discussion has occurred on several occasions looking to tb< 
establishment of a clinic for the examination of eye, ear, nos< 
throat conditions of tubercular patients; it being felt that such n 
should be independent of the ordinary clinic having the care of 
ailments. 

Two Buick ambulances fully equipped according to the best modern 
standards were purchased during the latter part of the period 
mentioned. 

The John Dibert Tuberculosis Hospital was completely rem 
including the interior painting of the building, installation of plu 
and heating facilities, construction of a new roof and installat 
elevators; at a total cost of $47,518.30. These funds came from 
cial legacy of $50,000 provided for this work by the Will of M rs 
Christine Butterworth Dibert. 

IV. 

The incidents of war have necessarily brought about many cha 
of policy and detailed management with respect to the admi> 
of the hospital 

Emergency staff and units consisting of doctors, nurses and auxilinr' 
workers have been organized for the use in event of any wartime 
gency, pursuant to the request of the Federal Government. Bin 
paper has been installed in all necessary parts of the buildings; 
hags, sand pails and shovels and other equipment required for ■ 
guishment of incendiary bombs have been distributed through the 
ings and grounds and many other measures have been taken l<> , 
the premises and patients from air raids. 

Demonstrations have been arranged on the grounds of the hosji 
familiarize employees with the manner of extinguishing incendiary ; 
and certain members of the staff have been especially trained to . 
any such emergency. The staff has shown their efficiency in two 
black-outs. 

Efforts have been made to have the gas tanks of the New Oi 
Public Service, Inc. removed from the rear of Charity Hospital. Th, 
Orleans Public Service has agreed to have the tank nearest to th 
P'tal kept empty for the duration of the war, and has agreed that 
would make arrangements whereby the other tank, which is comj 
water sealed, could be emptied in sixteen minutes if any ernei 
arises. They further agreed that if a situation develops in . 



: VICE-PRESIDENT'S REPORT 27 

within one thousand miles of New Orleans where there might be danger 
of an air raid, they would empty this tank- and keep it emptied foi 
duration. 

There has been established in Charity Hospital a Clinical and Lab- 
oratory Unit of ten beds to be set aside therein for the care and study 
of badly contaminated accidental wounds and burns simulating as nearly 
as possible war casualties. This Unit has entailed no expense whatsoever 
for the establishment or operation. The Clinic was proposed by Dr. Alton 
Ochsner, Professor of Surgery of the School of Medicine of Tulane 
University of Louisiana pursuant to suggestions of the Surgeons General 
of the Army, Navy and Public Health Service of the United States. 

Plans were discussed by the Board of Administrators on several occa- 
sions for the establishment of a blood serum bank under the control of 
the Board of Administrators and the Director of the Charity Hospital; 
to be operated under the supervision of the Medical Department of Louis- 
iana State University with Dr. Urban Maes, Professor of Surgery, in 
charge. This unit had not been established at the end of the period 
above mentioned, but indications were that during the early part of the 
ftext biennium these plans would be brought to a successful conclusion. 

Frequent discussions were had during the above mentioned period 
relating to the possible use by the Federal Government of the vacant 
iiuildings on the grounds of the hospital, especially with respect to the 

ado and Miliken and Lapeyre-Miltenberger Buildings, for the use of 
increased hospital facilities in this area. 

V. 
It was voted that in the future name plates are to be placed on alt 
new equipment purchased from legacy funds; such name plates to indi- 
cate sources of the funds by which such equipment was purchased and 
phrased in such terms as would indicate that such equipment is a 
memorial. 

Because of the closing sometime ago of the Delgado Hospital Build- 
ing, in which a space had been provided for a Protestant Chapel, it was 

led by the present Board, to equip a separate room in the new main 
building wherein the Protestant Churches could conduct religion 
1 " be known as the Delgado Chapel. This new Delgado Chapel was com- 
pleted ;i» a cost of $6,937 (provided out of the income from Trust Funds) 
and publicly opened and dedicated on September 14th, 1941. Mr. Don 
Freret. Vice President, and Mr. Fred W. Matthews, Secretary-Treasurer, 
represented the Board of Administrators at the dedication. 

Conferences with the Board of Supervisors of the Louisiana State 
■rsity A. & M. College, at Baton Rouge, have been held on one 

<>r two occasions with reference to transferring title to the ground now 
lied by the medical school of that Institution, and also to the 

ground between the medical school building and Tulane Avenue. This 
jfer is requested in order to permit the medical school to extend its 

building in the direction of Tulane Avenue and enable the school to have 

B landscaped garden installed on this ground. The Board of Admin- 
tors feels that the great obstacle to this program, however, is the 
thai the Delgado and Miliken Buildings would have to be demolished 
ri y out such a plan, and opposition has been voiced by the S) 
tee of these two buildings. 

a June 1st, the Board of Administrators (at their own expen 
nted Dr. Erasmus Darwin Fenner, at his residence, a Silver 
Loving Cup inscribed "In recognition of fifty years of continuous, con- 
scientious and efficient service to the Charity Hospital 1892-194'J". 



28 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 

VI. 

During the latter part of the above biennial a serious emerj:. 
arose with reference to the financing of the Hospital, and it was 
nouneed by the Governor that the Hospital would have to be cloa 
July 1st, 1942. Thereupon a very careful examination was made 
then existing policy with reference to the administration of the H. 
ami treatment and discharge of patients, and the following rules of 
cedars were thereupon adopted, to-wit: 

RULES 

"1. Admissions are until further action limited to acute illnesses 
absolute emergencies. Orders are to be issued to effect the imm< 
discharge of all patients where such action would not jeopardize 
h'iilth or lives. 

2. The (Vth, 7th and 11th floors of the Main Hospital Building 
to be closed in order to concentrate patients in smaller areas and this- 
fing. 
All Out-Patient Clinics are to be closed on July 1st." 

The adoption of these rules had the effect of a marked red 
of personnel. However, the most competent seventy-five per cent of U* 
i f were retained. 

All tubercular patients whose physical condition permitted wei 
charged and the policy was adopted of gradual discharge of acuti 
tubercnla ts, as their condition permitted. 

Gradually patients were concentrated in wards in order to close addi- 
tional floors. 

On July 15th, 1942, funds having been provided therefor, the • 
reopened to fare for approximately twenty-five per cent, of 
former volunir of patients. 

Thereafter all clinic cases were admitted on a strict appointmenl 
ami wiii' Limited in patients where Clinic care was mandatory in J 
talisation. 

The Committee in charge emphasised the fact that the hospita 
no! <l. and that the quoted ratio of personnel to p;; 

had net taken into consideration the following significant facts: 

The i of the institution, prior to July 1st, \<i-Vl, numberinj: 

approximi ,:s caring not only for the 2,000 in-pat 

ho applied daily to the Clinics. In 
linn lo theM patients, an average of about 550 patients 

ted dally in the Admitting and Accident Rooms, 60'/! of 
Itted to the hospital wards, It is evident, therefore, that 
ove wre bandied daily by this staff of 2,600. With I 

exception of the Clinic personnel, a large proportion of the staff 
three shifts. 

The Committee filsn pointed mil that in addition to the actual , 
of patients, the hospital was charged with the duty of providing 
facilities and instn idents for two medical schools, a S 

nf Nursing, s School of Social Work and Dental and Pharmacy S, 
All of these are of tremendous importance today in the national 

ram, 

Furthermore inted out that the hospital must »b*" 

md therapeutic facilities whir". 
'"■ purpc rvicing patients front < ; 

Lion but owned Hospitals. 

be Committee showed thai eomparine the Charity Hi 
..f Louisiana at Mew Orleans with other ns in the State, it 



VICE-PRESIDENT'S REPORT 29 

Se7I£^aWW, tH « **#» °f "tatf to patients is further affected by 
laLndrV whTh y ^ OSI t )llal ° f ^ B i? aM at New 0rieana <*«*- its 
rU f H "nc?u'dpri « tfc ™ a , ms a sta " <* 122 members and that this 
"f L other S^Jnu,^,^ 1 P«»nne -to-patient ratio. This is not true 
contract Sta te-owned General Hospitals, having their laundry done by 

anxiftv rt ^ n ?^ ly R thS A T 1 *^?' Which was the cause ° f verv < ? reat 

State L farL waTl^' Kf i]K ° f the ¥ ty of New 0rlea " s and » ^ 
latu™ «f „ 4LT 5 i by *^ e P assa * e . at « special session of the Leeis- 
heChaHtv H^i^f 1 ,'"? taX 1° provide funds for the operation of 
n sieht »nd w?th ° f Lou \ slana a * New Orleans and with these funds 
*Ja .md with a somewhat curtailed service in clinics and in the 

«?o °the rlfv 3 ^' °S , H ° SpitaI J WM ab,e to «**«. S%.Tu»W. 
-rwies to the City of New Orleans and to the State, 

fnr "L he Bt J ard ,-? f Administrators tenders its gratitude and appreciation 
for th,splen,h ( i support and cooperation to the Director the Sisters 
5fi3S&S^5Sh2f HeaC ' H and /" ™&°y<*s- We are also Tos 

iCpita Guild the &&fZfJ en<te ^ d ..^ the Ladies of the Ch; "^' 
' i fu • • ss ' the Nurs cs* Aides, and others who so een- 

is MM&Sr and «»**■*- '- «- ^nem of "& 

Respectfully, 

I'. S. WEIS, 

Chairman, Finance Committee, 

Acting on behalf of Mr. Douglass V. Frcrrt 

Vice-President, Absent, in the Armed 

Forces of the United States, 



30 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1042 

CHARITY HOSPITAL OF LOUISIANA 
AT NEW ORLEANS 



July 1, 1942. 

His Excellency 

Governor of trie State of Louisiana, 

Honorable Claude Harrison, Director 
Department of Institutions 

Board of Administrators 
Charity Hospital of Louisiana 

Gentlemen: 

Since March 1, 1941, it has been my pleasure to serve as Director <>'■ 
this jrreat charitable institution and 1 wish, first of all, to expt-t 
sincere appreciation to the Governor of the State, to the Director 
Department of Institutions, and to each and every member of the 
of Administrators, for their cooperation and assistance to me. 

Also my appreciation to the Visiting Staff, to the members of t 
Resident and Intern Corps, to the Sisters, and to the employer 
Hospital for their loyalty and cooperation at all times. 

Prior to my taking up the duties of my office, I find in the ■■ 
many activities of the Board worthy of mention, notably, the foli 
appointments : 

DR. LEON J. MENVILLE, Part-time Director of the Department "'■ 
Radiology. 

DR. EMMA S. MOSS, Director of the Department of Pathology. 

DR. JOHN ADRIANI, Director, Department of Anesthesia, 
These departments are now in excellent condition under th. 
competent supervision of the above mentioned individuals. 

Doctors J. O. Weilbaecher and Charles B. Odom, Acting Directed, 
kindly agreed to remain in the capacity of Assistants until the cl< 
the fiscal year, June 30, 1941. Their services can not be fully m<-. 
in the mere expression of gratitude, and I shall always look back 
much pleasure to the association with them. 

The salaries of the Senior Interns were raised from $10.00 to 
per month. 

Thirty doctors were sent from this Institution to the southu 
portion of Louisiana for relief during a flood. This was by requ. 
Governor Jones. 

The White Out-Patient Clinics of the new Hospital building w* 
opened September 3, 1940. 

A Health Unit was established for subsidiary workers employed b! 
the Chanty Hospital. 

On March 1, 1941, I was appointed Director of the Charity Hospit* 
of Louisiana at New Orleans. 

On July 1, 1941, the resignations of Doctors J, 0. Weilbaecher & 

< 'ha rles B. Odom were accepted. 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT 81 



On July 1, 1941, the appointments of Doctors 0. V, Prejean, P. J, 
Thomas and L. J. O'NeiJ, as Assistant Clinical Directors, were made. 

During the past year a Protestant Memorial Chapel has been built 
and equipped at a cost of $6,937.00, which was paid for out of endow- 
ment funds. 

The Dibert Memorial Hospital for tuberculosis patients has been 
renovated, including painting, installation of plumbing, heating facili 
*«., at a cost of over $30,000.00, This was paid for out of endowment 
tunds under control of the Board of Administrators of this Hospital. 

The building known as the Old Interns' Building has been renovated 
ond equrpoed for use as a residence for graduate nurses working in the 
Chanty Hospital. 

New surgical instruments amounting to over $11,000.00 have been 
Purchased and paid for out of funds under control of the Board. 

Modern cubicles have been installed in the Children's Division of the 
Hospital, at a cost of approximately $11,000,00. 

A Dietetic Laboratory for use in the training program of nurses 
and dieticians has been installed. 

A new ventilating system has been installed in the nurses' and em- 
ployees' dining rooms. Soap dispensers and towel racks installed in New 
•Mam Building. 

The building known as the Old Ambulance House has been reno- 
vated for use as a home for the female doctors attached to this Hospital. 

The above items were paid for from funds under control of the Board 
Administrators of this Hospital. 

Sweeping changes in the business control of the Hospital have been 
•"ade and a system of accounting and statistical control for the proper 
at uninistration of the Hospital has been installed. 

The separation of the duties of the Secretary-Treasurer of the Hos- 
pital and the Chief Accountant of the Hospital was deemed advisable and 
has been put into effect. 

The books of the Hospital were converted from single entry to double 
entry bookkeeping to conform with the State Department of Finance stan- 
dard practices and instructions as to the proper classification of expendi- 
tures and Hospital accounting and statistics, approved by the American 
""spital Association, 

Physical inventories of all hospital property were taken, evaluated, 
&nd set up on the books. Perpetual inventories of materials and supplies 
"id proper control records are now being kept, maintaining definite 
Accounting control of all properties of the Institution. 

Monthly financial and statistical statements are now prepared giving 
* true and complete picture of the finances and operating costs of the 
Institution. 

_ Department heads are furnished with a monthly budget and are re- 
quired to live within this budget. 

Payment to employees of the Institution by cash has been discon- 
tinued, Salaries are now paid by check and payment thereof has been 
hlaced under rijrid control. Photostatic copies of the payroll are sent to 
the Department of Institutions at the end of each month. 

The warehouse has been systematized, properly equipped, and is now 
^eprating under a controlled inventory system. 



32 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 

The Purchasing Department has been reorganized and made the s 
purchasing- agent for the entire hospital. All purchases over $50(< 
advertised and bids called for which are opened in public and 
given to the lowest bdider. 

This Hospital is cooperating with the Angola Penitentiary by buyi 
product.' which the penitentiary is in a position to supply and which 
Hospital can use. 

A Multigraph Department with proper equipment has been 
in the Hospital and all stationery, forms, etc. are now printed 
Department. Hospital stationery and Hospital forms have been st;i 
ized and simplified. This has resulted in a great saving to the I 

lion. 

A department having jurisdiction over all traffic problems and # 
ployees who come in contact with the public has been established 
tures and written instructions are given to this group of emplo; ,. 
include such employees as telephone operators, elevator operators, 
men, ambulance drivers, etc. 

A Visitors' Pass system was devised and put into effect, eliminate 
promiscuous visiting outside of regular visiting hours. 

A Personnel Department has been established under the supc 
of the Personnel Department of the Department of Institutions ami 
the guidance of the Civil Service Commission of the State of Lou 
This Department acts as a clearing house for all employees. A. 
personnel records are maintained. Analysis of qualifications ne 
for every position in this Institution has been made and the require 
established. These are kept in the Personnel Department. I.ikewi 
Establishment Lists showing number, type of positions and salarit 
been set up. 

Siirrcya covering practically every clinical department of the B< 
u L Ve ,3eerl made > resulting in numerous administrative <-< 

throughout the Institution, eliminating duplication of effort and delay. 

Time-check systems have been set up throughout the Hospital for <•' 
proper establishment of responsibility for any delay in servi 

A clink for the treatment of syphilitic obstetrical cases h 
established with proper laboratory facilities. 

In cooperation with Tulane and Louisiana State Universities, ai 
Maternal and Child Welfare Department of the City Board of I 
an out-patient delivery service with pre-natal, post-partal and 
clinics has been established. 

A reclaimed gauze unit has been established. In this unit, usi>. 
is laundered, stretched, sterilized, and refolded. Approximately 
dressings have been made and stored against a possible war ernt-i 

A salvage Department for the purpose of collecting paper, eas 
boxes, and egg crates, etc., has lic.-u sci up, as a result of which 
stantial revenue is being realized. 

During the past year the quarters maintained by the Orleans 
Tuberculosis League were lost through foreclosure of a mortgage. ( 
Hospital voluntarily accepted their unfortunate charges for care 
this Institution. 

The main hospital and outer buildings of the Institution were k'' r 
in good repair. 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT 



In order that this Hospital may realize the benefits of the Correjolles 
bequest, plans and specifications have been drawn up covering- an addi- 
tion to the waiting rooms of the clinics. These will be submitted to the 
Courts for approval. 

During the past year the Welfare Department of the State of Louis- 
iana relinquished the certification of patients to this Institution, thus re- 
quiring the setting up in this Hospital of an Investigating Bureau, 
litis has been done under the supervision of the Social Service Depart- 
ment of the Hospital. 

On January 1, 1942, the Unit Record system was instituted in this 
"ospital. At the present time, there are over 60,000 completed unit rec- 
ord histories. 

The nursing situation in this Institution has become very acute. 
The demands of the armed forces of our country are great because of the 
nt emergency and this Hospital is losing nurses at a very rapid 
rate. In an endeavor to meet this emergency an intensive campaign of 
advertising over radio and newspapers was carried on previous to the 
acceptance of our regular class of under-graduates last fall. By this 
, we were able to fill our requirements. 

As a war measure the Federal Government issued a grant from the 
u > S. Public Health Service to this Hospital. This enabled the Hospital 
'o admit an additional class of fifty-three nurses during January 1942. 

\ three months' refresher course for inactive registered nurses was 
in February 1942 through a Federal grant from the U. S. Public 
H'ralih Service. 

nder the auspices of the American Red Cross, and with the coop- 
on of the Federal Government, this Hospital is training Volunteer 
ea' Aides. On March 10, 1942, our lirst class, numbering twenty- 

u'laduated. This work is being continued. 

The question of maintaining the staff of physicians is one of great 

tance to this Hospital, Charity Hospital hasnot only a service func- 

wffl to perform, but also a teaching duty, as within the wards of this 

Ital, nurses, doctors, and medical students are taught. The need of 

armed forces for competent physicians is great and this Hospital 

with pride to its record of having sent over 100 of our resident 

i-ians into the armed services. This drain on our resident staff is. 

however, of serious import to this Institution, and we are facing a very 

is and critical condition. We hope for some stabilization of this 

problem through the cooperation of the Procurement and Assignment 

sj'ivice and the setting up and maintaining of an essential staff within 

Hospital. 

The maintenance of personnel in other departments of the Hospital 
has, likewise, become a very serious question. Public institutions are un- 
able ; i he competition of private industries or plants engaged in 
iction of materials needed by the armed forces of our Government. 
This situation is rapidly becoming very serious. We are endeavoring to 
meet it by training our own personnel wherever possible in all specialized 
work pertaining to hospitals and by the substitution of female labor 
wherever possible. 

This Hospital has cooperated with the Office of Civilian Defense by 

nting proper blackout precautions, by setting up and trainiiv. 

ua units necessary for protection of this Institution and its patients 

during any emergency, and by the organization of emergency medical 

■quads to care for the casualties throughout the City in the event of a 

ler. 



34 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 

The authorities of this Institution realize the mounting c 
iveiything which goes into the establishment and operation of tb 
pital. Equipment of all kinds has increased in tost and is often inij 
to obtain at any price. Materials and foods of all kinds have grea 
creased in cost- 
Living expenses have become higher, which means salarv i>. 
must be granted to our employees. The competition for skilled lab 
become very keen. The loss of the trained personnel in this Hosi 
viewed with alarm by all connected with the Institution. 

The condition which the Hospital faces because of these emti 
- n serious, The difficulties of obtaining and maintaining p<.. f 

both professional and non-professional, are probably the questions 

greatest importance at the present time. 

Respectfully submitted, 

O. P. DALY, M. D. 

«„.-, „„ Director 

OPD:DB 




IF S f 







Ambulance House, Automotive Repair Shop, Plant and Maintenance Offices— 1939 




DIRECTOR'S REPORT 



DIRECTOR'S STATISTICAL REPORT 
Year Closing June 30, 1942 



35 



DISTRIBUTION OF BEDS 

White Male _ . 65fi 

White Female 7J3J) 

Colored Male I" " 5Q5 

Colored Female . 727 

Children ~~~ 2it 

Bassinettes ""II""!! 17.J 



General Medicine .. 

Pediatries 

Neuro- Psychiatry 

Dermatology. 

Contagious Diseases 

tuberculosis 

General Surgery 

Gynecology . 

Urology 

Obstetrics 

Bassinettes _ _ . 

By«, Ivar, Nose and Throat. 
Orthopedics and Fractures 

Radium 

Dental Si^rgery 



Total. 



Other Services: 
Doctors" aud Nurses' Infirmaries 

Observation Rooms 

Basal Metabolic Wards , 



Total 

GRAND TOTAL- 



Total... _ ..3,055 



White Colored Total 



232 


232 


464 


152 


62 


211 


1's 


2S 


56 


22 


22 


11 


71 


71 


1 12 


335 


160 


495 


222 


220 


442 


117 


117 


234 


77 


78 


1 55 


108 


121 


229 


72 


102 


174 


67 


17 


11 1 


119 


100 


219 


23 


22 


45 


14 


14 


28 



White Colored Total 



38 




38 


9 


9 


18 


10 


13 


2:; 



OUT-PATIENT RECORD 

New Cases 

Old Cases 

Re- Visits... .. 

Plus emergency cases treated in Accident Room...!! 

Total... 



3,055 



AVERAGE COST PER PATIENT VISIT. 



79 

•J.iai 



29.247 
107,867 
403,464 

49,094 

r.s>.ui72 
.77 



FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL REPORT 

CHARITY HOSPITAL OF LOUISIANA 

at 
NEW ORLEANS 

Year Closing 
June 30, 1942 

By L. A. MILLET 
Chief Accountant 



REPORT OF ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 



39 



LOUISIANA AT NEW ORLEANS 
AS AT JUNE 30, 1942 

LIABILITIES 

General Fund Liabilities: 

Mints Payable-Trade. _| 52,583.58 

'I Payroll Payable .ss.r.l t.'.il 

bility 1 nsurancc (Contra I. 1,318.31 

m Keys and Badges..--.. 516.00 

1 Wages 707.55 

awards 470.00 

Undeposited Petty Cash luuid Checks i r,o 

tits Payable- Miscellaneous 

\ P Tajwell-Inconie Refunds 9,319.34 



Purchase Commitments [Contra] 



I Pund Deficit-June 110, 1942. . 
d Liquidation Pund Surplus, 
June 30, 1042 

Fliad Liabilities: 

Payable-1938 Issue... 

Payable- 1'.):! 



Honds paid 9 '16/41. 
it itanding 



Reserve For Endowment Funds 

Reserve For Bond Liquidation 

Other Reserves: 

Building ImiiiiI Accounts 

--$ 
Bollding Equipment Pund 



86,167.00 
20,042.70 



186,179,22 
10.101.15 

18,762.10* 

I Mi, 625.00 

LtoO.000.00 
L500,000.00 

N.ii.,(l,i)00.00 

ill, oon .oo 



1S6.625.00 



50.20<l 7(1 



166,280.37 



167,862.90 



8,559,000.00 

2.175.003.62 



242,834 70 



Plant Capital and Depreciation Reserve: 

7,355,601 II 
ciation 
Bldgs 1,466,504.33 

roi Depreciation — 
Equip 517,262.55 1. lis::, 7 mi s. 



ipital 



S 9,339,367. '.HI 



igurc. 



$ 20.950.3 1U.5S 



STATEMENT OF 



State Appropriation 

Legislative Appropriation. 



Cash Receipts 

Cash Balance June 30. 1041 1 

July, 1941.. 

August. 1941 

September. 1941 

October. 1941 

November, 1941 

December. 1911 

January, 1942 ."!"" 

February, 11142 

March. 1942. 

April, 1942 

May. 1942 

June, 1942 

Deduct — Cash Discounts earned 

to 5/31/42 



Deduct-Ineome Transferred to La 
State Treasury, 8/30/42... 

Total Receipts-State Appropriation. 

Transferred from Bond Liq. Fund 



INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 
June 30, 1942 



Hospital 
Income 



20,686.86 
6.82884 
8,008.29 
6,19: 
7,040.45 
5,020.12 
8,938.27 
1 1 .380.76 
10,425.58 
7,602.88 
7.1SS.0-! 
5,502.98 
4,350.61 



Warrants 
Drawn 



Total 
2,467,000.00 

608.047,04 



For Bonds 
and Inter 
I 800.000.00 



Total 
S 3,267.000 00 
608,017 04 



364,640.00 

220.243.00 

•54,50 

200.000.00 
195,000.00 
300,000.00 
280,000.00 
260,000.00 
290,000.00 
290,000.00 
128,792.24 



109,140.92 
10,40 1,28 



2.985,629,74 



3,075,047.04 800,000.00 3,875,047.04 

20,666 B6 20.666.86 

;'.«8.84 371,468.84 

-.2,1.29 

163,146.74 800,000.00 1,263.146.74 

7,040!.-- 140.45 

203,020. 1 2 205 020 1 2 

203,933.27 

311,380.76 311,380.76 

290,425.58 290.425.58 

287.602.88 267,602 ss 

297,188.04 2ft7.18s.04 

295,502.98 2i 15. 502.98 

133.142 85 [33J 



3,094,770.66 
10,404.28 



800.000.00 



3,894,770.66 
0,404.28 



98,736.64 2.985,629.74 3,084,366.38 800,000.00 3.884,366.38 



9,319.34 



9,319.34 



89,417,30 2.9 



3,075,047.04 
195,387.60 



800,000.00 

195,387 50' 



9,310.34 



3.875.04 7". ffl 



O 

X 

> 

H 

>< 

X 

o 
<n 

— 

> 

r 



- 



Cost of operation. July 1, 1941 to 6/30/42. 
Less-Cash discounts earned 



Trttal Operating Co-' 

Add-Capitaf Expenditures, 7 1 u to 30 42 






3,383, 254, Sft 
11,159.97 

3,372,094.92 
10.037.88 

3.382.1 



3.2,0,434.54 604,612.50 3,875.047.04 



117. 






CHARITY HOSPITAL or LOUISIANA AT NEW ORLEANS 
Comparative Statement of Monthly Cuti of Operation 
Fiscal Vaar— July 1, 1941 to June 30. 1942 



1941 
July, | 170 



tries 
& Wages 



August _.. 168,844.34 

September 1 68,661.02 



October . - 
November 



December 

1942 

January : 190,348.32 



171,218.01 

170,41s IB 
190,838,50 



Food 



1125,630.84 



39.MS riT 



Drills & 
Surgical 
Supplies 



24,936.3] 



February 

March 



189,30-1.94 
187,754 58 
185,821.44 



April 

May 183,587.84 

June ! 181,772.76 



Deduct Cash Dis- 2,158,863.77 

counts Earned 
Total Operating — — — 

Expenses. ...... 2.1 58,863.77 



40,015.39 22.S58.79 

42,764.99 30,596.39 

39,843,52 28.073.18 

41,428.51 18,208.62 

40.400,87 28,149.69 

39,300.9Sr 25,484.24 



Operating 
Supplies 



12,869 62 
40.817.301 
(0,618.39 

40,627.50 



31.043.9 
23,177.93 

22,736.33 
25,875 37 



192,089.51306,771.60 



$28,785 0* 
31,459.00 
33,089.46 
30,570.07 
31,667.13 
31,22 
30,499.66 
29.569.7S 
31,022.32 
29,832.47 
29,480.13 
30.335.40 



368,53*) !i 



492,089. 5 1306.771 60 



& Maint 

Supplies 



$ 4,925.97 

4,936.72 
7,449.31 
3,904 73 
2,304.98 
5,413.76 
4.662.59 
4,987.45 

4,370.43 
5,175.61 



Total 



56.990.57 



S 273. 1 
269,398.81 
269,561.38 
282.698.77 
273.<I97.05 
284,009.54 
294,813.80 
288,322 48 
298,668 7s 
283.886.67 
280,7 i:; U 
283,786.64 



Patient-Days 



In- 
patient 
Days 



3,383,254.89 

11,159.97 



75,194 
71,123 
68,812 
68,302 
68.636 
62,996 
62,1 n;;; 
69,258 
66,953 
65,065 
66,918 
60,920 



Oat- 
Patient 
Visits 



36.S.539.44J 56,990.571 3,372,094.92 



796,740 



77.3115 
05,439 
50,519 
55,196 
41,212 
41,529 
12,428 
:-;s.'j(>i 

45,056 
14,083 
13,893 

44,321 



Cost per Patient 



In- 
patient 
Days 



796.740 



589,672 



Out- 
Patient 
Visits 



3 161 

3.28 
3.38 
3.67 
3.45 
8.90 
4.07 
4.22 
3.87 
3.77 
3.63 
4.04 



3.67 



589 



8721 



3.66 



.46 

.55 
.72 

.70 
.00 
.92 
.95 
1.00 
.88 
.87 
si; 
.85 



.77 



W 
H 

13 
O 

w 

-3 
O 

> 
o 
o 

o 
G 
2 
H 

V. 

o 

a 

PJ 
"0 

> 

7Z 

*4 
2 
M 
2 

H 



.77 



SUMMARY OPERATING EXPENSES 
June 30, 1942 

Total July 1, 1941 to June 30, 1942 



EXPENSES 
Administrative and Genera] 
Housekeeping 

Maintenance 

Operation <.f Plant 

Laundry , 

Linen and Sewing Roomi 
Nurses Living Quarters 
Graduate Nurses Home 
Sisters Living Quarters 

Other Personal Quarters 

try 



Medical and Surgical Care. 
Nursing Service 

Central Service _ . 

Nursing Education 

Pharmacy . 

Medical Records. . . 

Social Service . 

Operating Rooms 
Delivery Rooms, 
Anesthesia, Gas Therapy 
X-Ray 



Laboratories 

Physical Therapy 

Jil« ctrocardiograph ..... 

Clinics . 

Ambulance. 

Emergency Rooms 



Salaries 

■ 19.03 

1 10,097.92 

114,112.82 

72,236.39 

63.282.47 

'75.03 

U.99 

1,793 85 

872.20 

[51,768 78 
97,800.30 

709.X97 -J,; 
43,849.21 
41,581.39 
16,199.21 
56,870-17 
64,071.63 
70, 15S.SK 
11.810.00 
30,380.03 
54,586.36 
70,600.77 
19,409.35 
11,284.16 

100,123 10 
11,020.00 

2,7/. 



other 
Expenses 
50,533.] t 
57.19 
101.14 

12,675.04 
12,759.63 

1,577.83 

693 s5 

7.24C, 10 

I -s 7 . 47 

521,174.57 

4,363.94 

2,003.26 

57,168.14 

76,622.05 

2,166.62 

2,883.62 

67,086.31 

11,133.19 

34,092.24 

57.7*7.90 

Ll.59X.2f. 

1,541.93 

2,917.38 

28,668.14 

5,318.56 

12,244.11 

269.01 



Total 

238,532 17 

152,665.11 

167.413.96 

21s.7S3.78 

75.057.51 

36,534.66 

7,110.82 

2,487.20 

8,118.30 

187.47 

672,933.36 

102,164.30 

711,900.52 

101,017.35 

4 4.847 5_' 
92,821.26 
59,036.79 
86,955.25 

1 16,242.19 
22,943.25 
54,472.27 

112,374.26 
82,190.03 
20.051.28 
14,201.54 

128.791,24 
10.338.5ti 
12,244.1] 
3,023 85 



> 

■< 

2 
> 

r 












DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOCV 43 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

September 17, 1C42 

To the Board of Administrators and 

tot 0. P. Daly, Superintendent 
Charity Hospital of Louisiana at 
•Vew Orleans, Louisiana, 

men : 

I submit herewith report of the activities of the Department of Path- 
Lty Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans for the fiscal year 
C .hi ml- 30. 1012. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EMMA S. MOSS, M. D., 
Director. 

ESM :mc 



44 



C11AIUTY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 



DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORIES 

TESTS PERFORMED 



Serology laboratory 
Biochemistry laboratory 



Blood matching laboratory 

H istopathology laboratory 

Emergency laboratory (night) 

Bacteriology laboratory (including 

Contagious Unit) 

White Out-Patient Clinic Laboratory 
Colored Out-Patient Clinic Laboratory 

Central Tuberculosis unit 

Hematology laboratory 

itology Laboratory 

real Diagnostic Laboratory 
Basal Metabolic Laboratory 
Friedman laboratory 



174,230 
58,162 
49,171 
77,103 
54,746 



38,210 

36,960 

59,658 

li,:i(i!» 

12,865 

17,277 

5,82fl 

3,452 

116 

611,545 



PASTEUR INSTITUTE 

Number of animal brains examined for Rabies 168 

Number of patients treated 229 

Number of patients under observation (not treated) 2,856 

Nunilier of treatments administered 2,856 



NECROPSY SERVICE 



Total deaths 
Co KB 

Coroner's cases autopsied 

Bodies delivered to Anatumv 

(Tulane, I. S. U. and Loyola) 
Bodies available for autopsy 
Total autopsies 



3,016 
878 
222 

116 



2,-Zi-i 

1,17s 






SCHOOL OF MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Number of students In training during the year 20 

N'h tuber of students who completed training during the year 7 

Number of student! who left before training was completed 10 

Students in training 3 




Hospital Power House, Warehouse and Animal House — 1939 



REPORT OF X-RAY DEPARTMENT 45 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT, CHARITY HOSPITAL 
Annual Report Period Ending June 30, 1942 

DR. Leon Mentnlle. Director and Radiologist 

DB, Manuel Garcia, Associate Radiologist 

Dr Dorothy Mattincly, Assistant Radiologist 

n r <i, H £ RRY Fishbein, Assistant Radiologist 

™ t ,„ Rlt - EY ' Second Year Resident in Radioloirv 

Dr. J. Hopkins, First Year Resident in Radiology 

DR. Marjorie Franz, Interne in Radiology 

TntaI , , DIAGNOSTIC DIVISION 

»«al number of patients examined aa , -,, 

Total number of films used.... ,^'°™ 

Total number of fluoroscopi.-s. ~"."~_"_".\ "II" '"."" 4 sill 

Hospital Casks 

;&:::::::::::::::::::::::::::;;:::■;::;;:;;;;;;;;;;; ?|« 

MenwNT Room and Clinic Cases 
White 

s c ^ - ::::::::: SS 

OF Films Used AS I r iil.l.owB 
14x17 

11x14 '""" -- 38 ' 779 

10x12 " " 10.ISB 

BxlO "" 27 -360 

6jx8j.:;;:;;;;;;::;;;:;;; — -- «.«» 

7x17 " - jJ > 224 

2,795 

tarts Examined as Follows 

5ij«ts 

Abdomen and pelvis ' «™ 

Sinuses *-™i 

Mastoids ''™i 

Upper extremities... - ~5i 

Lower extremities . . ... " ' — ' '!?f? 

Baatro-iatestiBal tract '"" 5«?? 

Getrfto-oriaary tract T'XiS 

-Spinal Column "" *•)** 

Cranium and bones of the face l&U 

vN lm . ,..,-, THERAPY DIVISION 

Superficial I herapy cases o <>a<> 

^Therapy cases.. ----.::::::::::::::::::::::::::: igg 

^Superficial Therapy treatments".""]" " ^'fif* 

■i **P Therapy treatments. " " , L' -.,= 

J mill ' 

Superficial Therapy new i W »!ff 

-Jeep Therapy new cases. . ,,.•, 

>ota1 --- ..... :::::::::::::::::::::. ,,fg 

\V h - te RADIUM DIVISION 

^"i'Ved --■ , 227 

— - - U4 

Respectfully submitted, 

Leon J. Mknwi.i.k. M.D., 

Director. Dept. of Radiology. 



45a CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 

REPORT OF THE HEART STATION 

Dr. O, P. Daly, Director, Charity Hospital, and 
Board of Administrators of the Charity Hospital 
New Orleans, Louisiana 

Dear Sirs: 

We wish to submit our annual report of activities of the IIe;ii 
tion at Charity Hospital. 

In the past year— July, 1941 through June, 19.12,— 12,259 e 
cardiogram* were taken and reported on patients in the Out-Patient a 
In-Patient Departments. This represents a 49r increase in the amou 
work in this category over the previous year. 

In the other two divisions of work; that is, fluoroscopic examin 
"l the heart and great vessels, and heart sound recordings, there 1 
been no great change in the volume of work done. 

Additionally, this year's report includes sphygmomanometer >, • 
ings and sedimentation rate studies done on patients in the Hospil 
This new- work does not represent a duplication of any service 
elsewhere in the Hospital. The sedimentation rate studies" are done • 
on young patients with rheumatic heart disease; a disease whicl 
has been under-estimated in this section of the country as a causal 
nf heart disease, 

During tin- past year there has been considerable increase in I 
terest shown by the Resident and Interne Staff in the work of the 
Station, in that we feel more advantage is being taken of what is < 
in the way of diagnostic help in eardio-vascular diseases. 

We wish to thank the Director of the Hospital and the 
Administrators for their excellent eo-operation during the past 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD ASHMAN 
Director. 

Per D. S. 

JAMES L. GOUAUX 
Assistant Director, 

Per D. S. 

J[.<;:l>S 



STATISTICAL REPORT HEART STATION 
July 1, 1941 Through December 31. 1941 



Electrocardiograms : 


Jtily 


August 


Septi 


■ >l>er 


November 


DcccmliiT 


Total 


Heart Station 


736 

134 

13 


709 

3% 
17 


679 
15 


703 

121 
IS 


733 

331 

10 


690 

343 

6 


4,252 

2,310 

78 


Total 

Sound Recordings with KCG'S 

Fluoroscopic Examinations Recorded. 

Sphygmomanometer Recordings 

Sedimentation Rates _. 


1.1 S3 
S3 
67 
2* 
+7 


1,122 
47 

71 

S 

SO 


1,117!) 
41 
48 
34 
44 


1.142 
46 
55 

7 
27 


1,076 
41 
52 
12 
24 


1,083 
26 

7ll 
11 
32 


6,640 
233 

61 
224 







•Records were not kept until July 29, 1941. 
January 1, 1942 through June 30, 1942. 



Electrocardiograms: 


January 


February 


March 


April 


May 


June 


Total 


Ward Patients- . 


677 

316 

13 


13 
250 

l-i 


680 

350 

14 


697 

307 

30 


-I'll 

27! 

18 


517 

209 

13 


3,805 


Clinic Patients 

Heart Station. 


1,712 
102 






Total 


1006 
21 


913 

26 


Hill 
18 


1031 
25 


883 
11 


739 
9 


5,619 


Sound Recordings with ECG'S 


119 


Fluoroscopic Examinations Recorded 


33 


57 


!l| 


83 


55 


6 


325 


Sphygmomanometer Recording- 


13 


22 


11 


11 


10 


10 


77 


Sedimentation Rates -. 


58 


37 


53 


t',7 


M 


57 


311 



3 
PI 
> 
50 
H 

w 
H 
> 

5 
2! 

so 

H 

■0 

o 
so 

-3 



-i 



46 



CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 



PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 
MONTHLY TREATMENT RECORD 



July 1, 1941— June 30, 1942 



1941 



July 

August __ _ 
September 
October. . . 
November 
December. 

1942 
January. .. 
February. 

March . 

April 

May 

June 

Total... 



WHITE 



NEW 
PATIENTS TOTAL WARD CLINIC 



IMS 

it:; 
121 
93 
88 
79 



83 

so 

it'.l 
89 
1 J 

63 



1090 



1763 
1636 
1S84 
1841 
1502 
1386 



i2:w 
1 S67 
2572 
I960 
ix>] 
1567 



20432 



.')ftii 

r,7r, 
.-,12 
r,xr, 
443 
411 



128 

024 
1022 
635 
679 
482 



6992 



1167 
1061 
1072 
1256 
1059 
975 



805 

943 

1550 

1325 
1142 

Ills.'. 



13440 



COLORED 



N B W 
PATIENTS TOTAL WARD i 



sr, 
52 
65 
70 
57 
tit 



81 
75 

67 
S7 
73 
ill 



837 



850 
783 

>I2!P 

1163 

830 
901 



1405 
L037 
1253 

1138 

1112 

964 



1 2365 



337 
292 
303 
455 

280 



510 



410 
357 

279 



4140 



63 



310 












1940-1941 

Total Treatment*. 67,896 

Total Patients 32,429 

Tout New Patients _ [,927 

Number Working Days 306 

Doily Average Treatments. 221 * 

Dally Average Patients. 106 

(*} Figure of 199 in error — 



1941 

iil 

3a 

i 



308 

107 



lit!l 



July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December . 



1942 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Total. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 

MONTHLY TREATMENT RECORDS 
July 1, 1941— June 30, 1942 



Infra 
Rt'cl 



10S8 
902 

1921 

1262 

1007 

882 



096 
933 

1598 
969 
894 
712 



13164 



Dia 



1 [06 

522 
499 
540 
407 
480 



669 

435 
756 
730 
907 
833 



7790 



Whirl 
Pool 



•JNU 

319 
316 
359 
241 

215 



223 
233 

387 

405 
474 



3834 



Mass. 



1522 

1053 

944 

1149 

928 

932 



1142 

1074 
1263 
1121 
1021 

821 



129S0 



Tht-r. 
Ex. 



1012 
1004 

976 
1300 
1016 

977 



1257 

1342 
2041 
1332 
11S4 
1094 



14535 



Huh. 
Bath 



.V.l 
17 

M 

33 

15 
-17 



57 
42 
25 

38 

1(11 
47 



552 



('. V. 



2111 
292 
332 
407 
275 
205 



296 
385 
111 
352 
260 
236 



3772 



Freq. 
Curr 



326 

29 

32-1 
122 
280 
279 



383 

4112 
434 
355 
347 
344 



4193 



Sue. 
Pres 



16 
44 

■in 
25 



32 

3 

59 

50 

40 

11 



:■;;<; 



FT 



21 
28 
30 

35 
22 
31 



38 
25 
36 

34 
36 

is 



MF 

Tsl 



22 
22 

22 
19 

II 
12 



15 

9 

13 

11 

.". 
11 



Total 



RD 

Tst 



Polio 



354 



172 



5705 
4501 
5421 
5570 

12". 1 
4145 



5008 
4917 

7008 
5395 
5200 
4601 



61722 



(*) Includes Ionizatioa- 
Garvanic- 
Faradic- 
Sinusoidal- 

There were: 1323 Visits by polio patients during period: 
172 Muscle "Function Tests during period- 
165 Reaction of Degeneration tests during period (Included in Low Freq. Current si 



23 
15 
24 
13 
10 



19 
15 
10 
12 
8 



165 



I 47 
130 
128 

i:;s 

83 

107 



134 
125 
147 
103 
34 
47 

1323 



*3 
« 

7. 

o 

> 

t- 

X 
M 
se 
> 

Mj 

a 

H 

"0 

> 

to 

H 

3 

M 
Z 

H 



STATISTICS FOR THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 
For Fiscal Year 1941-1942 

Submitted by: Sister Ic.natia, R.N., Date: July li 

Director, Out- Patient Department 






/At ' fo//o*//i a atst/at/emt tj,h/et proton t i picture of tha Auoo «n,oi 
Out-Patient Depirtmgnt. 

TOTAL PATIENTS 



\t of work (/one In the homplt: 



SERVICES 



Surgery 

Vascular Disease 

Tumor 

Fractures 

Orthopedics 

Plaster Room 

Obstetrics 

Post- Partum 

Gynecology. . . 

Male Urology 

Female Urology 

Syphilis . 

Syphilis I Began I 31 

Eye , 

Eye (Refractions! 

Eae, Nose and Throat 

Dentistry 

Dentistry (House 

Medicine 

Metabolic 

Arthritic (Discontinued 9/27/41) 
Hypertension (Discontinued 

9/27/41) . .. 

Gastro-Intestinal (Discontinued 

9/27/41) 

Cardiac 

Neuro- Psychiatry 

Pediatrics 

Well Baby 

Dermatology 

Allergy 

Tuberculosis 

Clinic Cystoscopy 

Pasteur Clinic (Began 11/3/41) 
Totals 



WHIT1-: PATIENTS 



New In 
O.P.D. 



37 

37 

301 

1,080 

2 

44. i 

58 

812 

447 

[06 

;is 

o 

-Vi7 

32 

1,110 

477 

ION 

1,632 
18 




I 

G 

162 

864 

567 

510 

32 

104 

1 



12,889 



Did In 
O.P.D. 



4,805 
502 
1(11 
750 

2,618 
2*3 

1,596 

282 
2,586 

1,097 

.".I 

2,656 



2,383 

580 
3,367 
2,545 

734 
5,032 

4M 
23 

12 

16 
53 

957 

1.405 

t7a 

2,046 

1,502 

1.064 

51 

346 



40,700 



Total 



7,794 

539 

228 
1,051 
3,698 

285 
2,044 

340 
3.408 
1,544 

657 

2,694 



2,980 

612 
4,477 
3,022 

H42 

n.ur.i 

499 
23 

12 

17 

58 

1,119 

r.'ii'.i 

740 
2,556 
1,534 
1,168 

52 
663 



uii.<)K].;d PATIENTS 



New 111 
O.P.D. 



53,689 



2.6ISS 

82 

15 

125 

717 

6 

1,138 

92 

1,589 

1,132 

1 36 

180 



766 

23 

1,107 

684 

89 

1,739 

26 







3 

153 

1,219 
2,019 

430 

17 

78 

3 

152 



16,358 



Old In 
O.P.D. 



5,946 
592 
101 
378 

2,416 
238 

5,071 
561 

3,89 l 

672 

16,797 



2,766 

583 

3,176 

3,240 

656 

7.11 

lv» 
33 

18 

25 

124 

960 

2,326 

366 

2,950 

1,039 

685 

48 

229 



67,167 



Total 



8,63-1 
624 
116 

3,133 
242 

6,209 
653 

5,483 

4,479 

16,977 



3,532 

606 

4,283 

.;,!>_■ i 

7!5 
9,186 

511 

33 

18 

25 

127 
1,113 

3,545 
2,385 
8,380 
1,050 

763 
51 

381 



83,525 



Total Patients 
White & Colored 



16,428 
1.163 

344 

1,554 

6,831 

527 

8,253 

993 

8,891 

<i,ih>3 

1,465 

I '.1.671 



6,512 

1,218 

8,760 

6,940 

1,587 

1 5,850 

1,010 

56 

30 

42 

1N5 

2,232 

5,814 
3,125 
5,036 
2,590 
1,931 
103 
1,044 



O 
G 
H 

> 

z 

H 

a 

M 
I 

•z 



137,114 



TOTAL VISITS 



>hp vices 



Surgery. . 

Vascular Di 

Tumor. 

Fractures 
Orthopedics.. 
Raster Room 
Obstetrics . 
Post-partum 
Gynecology— 
Mali,* Irulugv 
Female l"; 
Syphilis 

Syphilis I Began I 31 12 
Bye. 

I Refractions 
liar, Nose and Throat 

I (enttstry. . . , 

1 'enlist ry i fluuse ' 

Medicine. 

Metabolic. . 
Arthritic (DiscontinuedQ 27 II 
Hypertension i Discontinued 
1] 
l i. Intestinal (Discontinued 

9/27/41,1 . ... 

Cardiac 

N'euro-Psyehiatry _ ... 

..itrics 

Well Baby 

Dermatology . 

Allergy 



WHITE PATH 



New In 
O.P.D. 



2,;»ssi 
3 
37 

HOI 

1,080 

2 

58 
812 
147 

toe 

38 



597 

82 

1.1 It) 
477 
108 

1.632 

is 

1) 



I 
5 

s>;i 
667 
B1Q 



Old In 
O.P.D. 



I, si I."-, 

191 
750 

2,6 is 
383 

1,599 

282 

2,596 

I, DO 
56] 

2.656 



2,383 

580 

2,545 
734 

5,032 

481 

23 

12 

16 

53 

957 

1,405 

173 

2,046 

1,502 



Revisits 



1 1,622 
2,576 

2.520 
9,561 
3,278 
5,687 
1,106 
6,704 
4,102 
2,510 

176 
5,970 

8,531 
5,423 
1,996 

18,753 
2,247 

22 

13 

22 

267 

1,421 

1,571 
6,155 

5,621 

.ill 



Tola! 
Visits 



19,416 
3,1 15 
865 
3,57 

7, Till 
1,446 

10,112 
5,646 
3,167 

16,566 

176 

8,960 

3,532 

i:;i)Us 

8,445 

2,838 

25,417 

2,746 

15 

25 

39 
325 

7,666 
2,311 



COLORED PATIIiXTS 



New In 
O.P.D. 



2,688 

32 

15 

125 

717 

6 

1,138 

92 

1,589 

1,132 

136 

I Ml 
(I 

766 
23 

1,107 

684 

89 

1,739 

26 







3 

153 

1.219 

2.01 '.I 

17 

7s 



DM In 
O.P.D. 



5,946 
692 

101 

:;7s 
2,4115 

236 
5,071 

561 
3,894 
3,347 

672 

Hi. 797 



2, TOO 

583 
3,176 
3,2 Id 

7,147 

is,", 

33 

18 

25 

I-'! 
!((>() 

2.326 
366 



Revisits 



13,648 
2,605 
362 
1,307 
8,641 
2,285 

17,567 
3, 1 1 8 
> i, ens 
8,896 
2,995 

97,002 
2,718 
9,550 
1 006 
9,170 
9,508 
2,28 1 

23,431 

2,612 

40 

25 

22 
117 
1,821 
8,863 
4,:i.il 
6,736 
6,004 



Total 

Visits 
22.2K2 

3,229 
17s 

1,810 
11,771 

2,527 
2:i,77i» 

3,709 
15,181 
l :j,:j7.-> 

3,803 
113,979 

2.71S 
13,082 

4.012 

1 3, 153 

13,432 

3.029 

32,617 

7:: 

43 

47 

574 

2,93-1 

12,408 

6,736 

10,11(1 

7,00(1 

1.12.-, 



Total Visits 
White & 
Colored 



11,698 
6,34 1 
1,143 
5,387 

25,033 

li.fi'.iu 
31,507 

5 2 i 6 
25,293 
19,021 

(i,970 
130,544 

2,894 
22,032 

s.j n 

20,101 
2I.S77 

5,867 

58,034 

5,769 

IIS 

68 

86 

899 

5,474 

20,074 

'.',((17 

18,827 

16,052 

(1,214 

650 



o 

IE 
> 

3 

H 
~- 

X 
C 
w 

•v 

H 
> 

r 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

Daily Average Patients Visits (White) 762 

Daily Average Patients Visits (Colored) 1,371 

No of Minor Operations in Surgical Clinics ' s l 

No. of Minor Operations in Urology for Men and Venereal Clinics — 71 O 

Total Minor Operations 865 ^ 

■ 

No. of Mantoux Tests made in Pediatric Clinics ],12A > 

H 

i — i 

Total Treatments Kiven in Salvarsan Clinics — 131,4. r ih ^ 

No. of Spinal Punctures made in Salvarsan Clinics... - . ... 1,090 ^ 

a 

No. of X-Rays made in Clinics.. 26.013 M 

> 
No. of Laboratory Tests made in Clinics 94,019 W 

a 

Dental Treatments given in Clinics - - 4,819 pj 

No. of Jaws Wired in Dental Clinics l> ' ^ 

if Wires Removed in Dental Clinics • - ,s 

Respectfully submitted, 

SISTER IGNATIA, R.N. 
Director, Out-Patient Department. 



NEW CASES TREATED IN OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 
For Fiscal Year 1941-1942 



MONTHS 



July. 

August 
September 

October 

November 
December 
January, 
February... 

March 

April 

May. - 
June 

TOTALS.. 



WHITE 
MALE 



71.1 

710 

fil 1 

155 

171 
450 

ua 

If is 
172 

SI 2 



0,372 



COLORED 
MALE 



798 

853 
896 

654 
121 
429 
187 
122 
530 
570 
503 
655 



7,077 



WHITE 

female 



77s 
716 
599 
698 
897 
in:: 
475 

II:-. 

505 
500 
512 

595 



6,553 



COLORED 

FEMALE 



1,044 
1,0112 

573 
571 
647 
547 
733 
757 

700 

81 1 



TOTAL 
\1 1 1 I 



1,560 
1,563 

1 .2*6 

1.2B.S 

876 

!MI3 
937 

835 

!li(S 

1 ,042 

1,014 

1,107 



9,245 13.449 



TOTAL 

FKM.tl.K 



I.N22 
1 ,808 

1,462 
1-.433 

1171) 

074 

1,122 

0112 
I.23K 
1,257 

1. 311 

1,400 



15,798 



TOTAL 
WHITS 



1,539 
1,456 
1,189 

1.212 

877 
925 
858 
973 
972 
965 
1,107 



12.02:1 



TOTAL 
COLORBD 



I. MM 
1,01.1 
1,559 

0!<l 
1,000 
1,134 

969 
1,263 
1.327 
1,360 
1,409 



16,322 



GRAND 

TOTAL 



3,3*2 

3,371 
2.7ls 
2,701 
1,846 
1,877 
■-Mi:,; i 
1,827 
2,336 

2.20') 
2.32.1 
2, r.76 



29,247 



O 

> 

«; 

CO 
o 

CO 

H 

> 

r 



to 



r 



DEPARTMENT OF ANESTHESIA 53 



Dr. 0. P. Daly JuJv 23, 1942 

Director 

Charity Hospital 

New Orleans. Louisiana 

The following is a report of the number of anesthesias administered 
°y th e anesthesia department from the period of July 1, 1941 to June 

Ether _ 3,353 

Nitrous oxide-oxygen 641 

Nitrous oxide-ether vapor 1,203 

Ethylene 305 

Ethylene-ether vapor __ 3,242 

Cyclopropane _________ 1,494 

■lopropane-ether vapor 401 

Spinal-general 317 

Local-general . 65 

Avertin-general — 28 

Sodium pentothal-general .__.. 34 

Vinethcnc 123 

Total Generals - 11,206 

Spinal . __ 2,272 

Local :;,192 

Sodium pentothal __ 531 

None _.._ _ 255 

Epidural 4 

Sacral - 7 

Avertin 18 

Evipal ... 2 

Avertin-local 5 

Spinal-local -.___ 6 

'thai-local 15 

Epidural __ •_ 

Total without Generals _ 6,312 

OBSTETRICAL WARDS 

N'itrous oxide 1,798 

-Nitrous oxide-ether vapor _— 921 

Local 381 

Cyclopropane-ether vapor 92 

vlene . _. 273 

Sodium pentothal . 6 

Sacral . . 1 

Local-general 46 

Vinefbene : 2 

Spinal 4 

Total 3.524 

Grand Total 21.042 

The activities of the anesthesia department . during the past 
have differed little from the preceding year. The only innovation was the 
lishment of residencies for physicians who wish to train in anes- 
thesia. 

Respectfully submitted, 

_. JOHN ADRIANI, M. D., Director 

IAh Department of Anesthesia. 



54 CHARITY HOSPITAL^1941-1942 

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE 

DEPARTMENT 

For the Period 7/1/41 to 7/1/42 

To the Board of Administrators and Dr. 0, P. Daly, Director of 
the Charity Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans. 

STAFF 

In June, 1941, the Governor's Reorganization Staff drew up a 
ii establishment list and organization chart for the Social S. 
Department. Through staff committees the department had a! 
worked up job descriptions and job qualifications, as well as a sugjj 
salary range. The suggestions of the Reorganization Staff and •> 
committees were pooled with the following result: a total staff of ;ii 
ical social workers was agreed on, including tin- director, 3 super\ 
and 3 assistant supervisors, plus 16 clerical workers. This establis) 
list was not developed on the basis of an ideal but rather on the ba; 
the minimum number of workers needed to service the hospital. Wil 
development of the establishment list, for the first time the depai 
could plan its work on the basis of a definite number of workers. 

Following the resignation of the former director on 6/15/41, an act- 
ing- director was appointed. A permanent director was appointed 1L' 

SALARY 

During the summer of 1941, as there was a considerable turnov. 
both the professional staff and the clerical staff, and as a number . 
placements were made at lower salaries, several small salary aiiji 
in the lower bracxets were approved. These adjustments equal 
aries in the clerical staff and brought them to the minimum or above. [tl 
December. 1941, with the additional funds secured from the Le- 
ii was possible to begin to equalize the salaries of the pmfessio] 
Several years ago the School of Social Service Administration, Univ, 
of Chicago, refused to let its graduates be employed for less than 
a month. In other sections of the country, such as St. Louis, the 
ning salary was $135 a month, while at Charity Hospital the 1,. 

salary was $110 a mi. nth. As it was necessary to secure ■- 
from schools other than Tulane to avoid in -breeding, this caused 
crepancy in salaries of workers with comparable training. Consul 
ill feeling among the members of the staff resulted. Furthern 
Tulane School of Social Work could rightly consider thai its 

being discriminated against. At present all members of the 
who have completed two years in a School of Social Work and who 
a .Master's Degree, make $125 a month. There is still inequality in 
department because some of the older workers with the same expe 

onlj recently worked up to $125. A salary scale based on e.lu. 
and experience has been drawn up, in order to insure that workers 
taken on the staff will not receive salaries out of line with the 
workers, and that when money for additional raises is available the 
can be made fairly. Although several years will be required to ei 
all salaries, the department considers that the first steps have bi 
In spite of the fact that there has been decided turnover in I i 
sional staff, replacements have been made without lowering si 
Although qualified workers were not always available for ii 
replacements, considering the period as a whole, there has not 1, 
dearth of applications. The fact that the department offers opport 
for well-rounded experience under supervision, as well as tin- 
workers from the department have advanced to state and federal i 
grams, makes employment at Charity Hospital valuable. 





Hospital Laundry — U)X9 



MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE 



FUNCTION ANO ORGANIZATION 

Case Work Services 

■ •!■ the attorney general's interpretation of Act 47 of 1940, social 
u-e departments could be maintained and developed with the institu- 

i under the Department of Institutions, directly responsible to the 
superintendent of each institution. However, the Department of Public 
Welfare was charged with the dual responsibility of certifying all patients 
in the hospital and of assisting with the discharge plans of all patients 
under treatment. Since it was obvious from the beginning that the De- 
partment of Public Welfare, because of insufficient funds and Ifa 
staff, could not assume this responsibility fully, the division of responsi- 
bility between the Social Service Department and the Department of 
Public Welfare had to be defined as broadly as possible. Actually the 

ion of the Social Service Department was not changed by Act 47, 
because the size of the hospital and the patient load had already made it 
necessary for the department to concentrate and restrict its activity to 
some extent within the four walls of the hospital. The department' has 
continued to handle social problems which occur as the result of illness 
and which frequently interfere with the patient receiving the maximum 

rt from treatment. In handling these problems, the department has 
worked not only with the Department of Public Welfare as outlined by 
Act 47, but with all public and private agencies in New Orleans and 
io the state. 

I the Social Service Department services the entire hospital, it is 
necessary to divide the wards and clinics to be covered on a geographical 
II as a service basis. 

Workers are assigned the following services: 

1. Gynecological and Female Genito-Urinary wards and Ear, Nose 
and Throat wards. 

2. Tumor Service. This includes the Tumor Clinic, radium wards 
ami deep x-ray therapy. Patients with a diagnosis of carcinoma 
are accepted for service regardless of ward, or clinic in which 
they are under treatment, .Male Genito-Urinary wards. 

3. Metabolic Clinic. In-patients with diabetes regardless of ward 
and patients with a diagnosis of diabetes in other clinics. 

4. Male Surgery wards, Male Neurological wards. 

5. Female Surgery wards, Female Neurological wards. 

(i. Colored Obstetrical Clinics, Colored Pediatrics Wards and Clinics. 

7. White Obstetrical Wards and Clinics, Colored Obstetrical Wards. 

R. White Pediatrics Wards and Clinics. 

B. White Tuberculosis (Tulane) Wards and Clinics. 

I". Whiir Tuberculosis (L.S.U.i Wards and Clinics. 

11, Colored Tuberculosis Wards and Clinics. 

12. While and Colored Male Medical Wards, White and Colored 
Male Dermatology Wjirds, 

1". White and Colored Female Medical Wards, White and Colored 
Female Dermatology Wards. Cardiac CIS 

II. White .Medical Clinics, 

15. Colored Medical Clinics. 

IS. White skin, Neurological. Gynecological, Surgical, Surgical Di*- 
hildren, Ear, Nose and Throat, Dental, Ha v fever 
Varicose Vein and Genito-Urinary Clinics. 



56 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 



17. Colored Skin, Neurological, Gynecological, Surgical, Surgical Dis- 
eases of Children, Ear, Nose and Throat, Dental, Hayf. 
Varicose Vein and Genito-Urinary Clinics. 

18. White Orthopedic Wards and Clinics. 

19. Colored Orthopedic Wards and Clinics. 

20. White and Colored Salvarsan Clinics. 

21. White and Colored Eye Clinics and Wards. 

22. White Admitting Department, White Accident Department, 
Contagious Unit. 

23. Colored Admitting Department, Colored Accident Department- 
Colored Contagious Unit. 

24. Intake and Intake Correspondence. 

The twenty-four workers assigned to these twenty-four services are 
responsible to five supervisors. Eight services are assigned to one super- 
visor for supervision, while seven are assigned to another. One supei 
is responsible for the Orthopedic Service, case work services to thi 
ployeea, plus the responsibility for the volunteer program. One si 
visor is responsible for the supervision of workers in thp Admitting 
partment and the program of the Admissions Unit, while a fifth h; ; 
the clinic services. 

These twenty-four workers handled 50,417 cases during the fi- 
year. This is an average case load of 2,107 cases per worker for the vear. 
The caseload by months is shown in the following table: 

July, 1941 _____„. 4,132 

August, 1941 4,498 

September, 1941 -—4,546 

October, 1941 4,961 

November, 1941 4,345 

December, 1941 4,400 

January, 1942 ______ „ 3,888 

February, 1942 :*,455 

March, 19-J2 3,788 

April, 1942 — 4,267 

May, 1942 4,160 






June, 1942 

Social Admitting 

In March, 1942, because of lack of funds, the Department of Pubte 
Welfare decided that it could no longer continue the certification 
gram begun in March, 1941, in accordance with the provisions ,. ; 
47 of 1940. During the period the certification program had been ; 
feet, the admissions to Charity Hospital had dropped 10,000, Althouc! 1 
it was not possible to state definitely that the certification program r. 
decreased admissions, it was thought that certification had served 
deterrent factor, and the hospital decided it would be valuable to 
an investigative unit to determine eligibility for free medical care 
selective basis. It was expected that an admitting program umi. 
supervision of Social Service would also serve as a deterrent. On 
this program was set up on a temporary basis, pending the establish 
of a uniform statewide program by the' Department of Institutions. 

In view of the fact that approximately 200 patients are admii 
the ward and 120 patients are admitted to the clinic every day, \vhi> 
are treated in the Accident Room, and, as it is financially impossi i 
the hospital to employ more than four workers to determine eli^. 



MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE 



for free care, it is obvious that each applicant for treatment cannot be 
investigated. The disadvantages of a scale were fully realized but as a 
means of helping to roughly screen those who could pay from those who 
could not, the following income scale was decided upon: 
$100 a month for a couple 
$ 75 a month for a single individual 
| 15 a month for each child or dependent 

Patients with incomes below the scale are not interviewed but an 
attempt was made to interview those whose incomes are above the scale. 
Only those which seemed questionable on the surface or were referred by 
hospital personnel were gone into further. Because of the difficulty and 
delay involved in determining eligibility of patients who live outside of 
Orleans Parish, most of the cases investigated were from New Orleans, 
Information in regard to income, debts and assets was verified, but 
before any decision as to ability to pay was made, the following factors 
were taken into consideration: the member of the family who is ill; the 
length of incapacity; prognosis; and probable cost of private medical care. 
On this basis the Admissions Unit decided whether or not applicants 
were eligible for free care. 

During the period March 1, 1942 through June 80, 1942, the Admis- 
sions Unit has interviewed 4,527 applicants, During this period 15,5*22 
patients were admitted to the wards and 8,924 to clinics, while 18,147 
patients were treated in the Admitting Room, The following table shows 
these interviews: 

Intel-views — Re: Treatment in Clinic — 2,475 

Full Investigation , ... 174 

Brief Investigation 2,301 

Found Eligible 2,291 

Other Decision 184 

Interviews — Re: Treatment on Ward 2,044 

Full Investigation 446 

Brief Investigation 1,598 

Fount! Eligible _ 1,792 

Other Decision 252 

Interviews — Re: Treatment in Ace. Room 8 

Full Investigation 3 

Brief Investigation ... „____ 5 

Found Eligible ■ 

Other Decision . — . _ 8 

Out of 4,527 patients interviewed, 4,083 were found eligible,- while 
444, or approximately 1%, were considered able to pay for care. 

Figures for the country as a whole indicate that about $% of the 
applicants for free care are found able to pay. The per cent at Charity 
Hospital might" have been higher if it had been possible to interview 
more patients in the Accident Room. Of the eight patients interviewed in 
the Accident Room, all ware found able to pay. Even though the number 
is small, it seems to indicate, as has long been felt, that there is more 

■ in the Accident Room than in the wards and clinics. Those patients 
considered eligible to pay for care were referred to private doctors or pri- 
vate hospitals. If this transfer were impossible medically, a recommenda- 
tion was made to the Business Office to the effect that the patient was 
able Ui pay for rare rendered. The Admissions Unit has no responsibility 
tor billing or collecting. 

1 1 is. as yet, too soon to evaluate the work of the Admissions Unit, 
but tin- following angles need clarification. 



68 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 19-J1-1LM2 



1. Arrange for the decision in regard to eligibility to be ineorm 
in tae medical ret 

2. Flan for the Business Office to refer patients who question billine 
to the Unit for further consideration and recommendations bef. 

is reduced or cancelled. 

3. Explore further the possibility of having a list of the doctors o" 
the Charity Hospital visiting staffs to be used for referral of p. 

who are considered able to pay. The procedure of referring all p- 
considered able to pay to the office of the Orleans Parish Medical Societ 
has not proved to be entirely satisfactory, 

1. Continue to clarify the hospital's medical care program, thi> 
lems of the Unit and the basis on which decisions are made. It v.-. 
ling of a number of doctors that in many instances the Uachini 
gram was interrupted because patients were transferred to other j 
facilities for which they were eligible after treatment was begun here. 

STUDENT TRAINING PROGRAM 

The department has continued to serve as a medical socia 
center in eonnecth'ti with the Tulare University School of Social 
during 1941-1942. During 1940-1941, an average of 
beer. d to the department for field work training in medieul 

work. In September, 1941, however, for the fall semester thirtex*- 

ned to the department. This was the largest 
ever assigned to Charity until February, 1942, when, as there w : . 
larger enrollment at the School than in September, the department 
to stretch its capacity to take eighteen students. Although in thi 
it was possible for the department to assist with supervision ol 
students, during the current school year, 1941-1942, such partici 
was not possible because of the turnover in the department and l„ 
the entire time the supervisory staff had been needed to induct ,-. 
the new workers in the department. Although the department 
been assuming any responsibility for actual supervision of students 
IS participation in the student program by every worker in the 
ment. Workers in the department gather potential case material 
lenta and at the end of each semester the more advanced si 

assigned to senior workers in the department, who are reap 
for a ward or clinic service, for what is known as a block , ,- . , 
There is a good professional working relationship between thi- 

'•e Department and the School. The School and the depart 
agreed that the programs of both are closely inter-related an.l 
dent on each other. Because the Social Service Departments in the a 
hospitals in New Orleans are not able to offer the wide v; 
number of cases which are available through this department, t 1 
School of Social Work prefers to use this department for the train;™ i- 
most of its students. Therefore, the School will place the larger i, 
of students at New Orleans Charitv Hospital. The Social Service 
partment, in turn, realizes that it will be dependent on the gradua 
the I ulane School of Social Work for the bulk of its employes an, 
its connection with the School means that it will be able to rr- 
MfSjKjJ Standards of practice and that it will have a higher standing" 

Besides this program the department continues to participate i, 
educational progra Chanty School of Nursing-. One of 

bers of the supervisory staff is responsible for the teaching ol 
courses for nurses. 



MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE 59 



SUPERVISORY PROGRAM 

Through conferences with the Educational Secretary of the American 
Association of Medical Social Workers, ft has been possible to consider 
the supervisory program objectively. In the past members of the 81 
yi.soi-y staff have been responsible for both administrative details and 
the broader aspects of case work. This is a difficult combination of re- 
soonsibllity and the result is thai one or the other is over-emphasized 
Because there was a tendency to emphasize the mechanical details of 
supervision, staff development was neglected. When in 1940 an educa- 
tional secretary joined the staff, she gradually became the supervisor 
•esponsible for the supervisory program of the department and conducted 
»n in-service training for new supervisors. This, however, made a 
ratner top-heavy supervisory st 

At present the tendency throughout the country is to have ease con- 
sultants and administrative assistants. Only the new workers therefore 
supervision, while the older workers receive supervision 
through consultation. In a department such as this with a rapid turnover 
t was thought that carrying out a supervisory program as outlined 
might be difficult. Besides the rapid turnover another factor needed to 
be considered. In view of the civil service ruling that new workers must 
uo employed at the minimum salary, it was to be expected that within a 
period the staff would be composed mainly of workers without 
experience. In spite of these two factors it was believed that with two 
consultants and three administrative assistants, this type of super- 
visory program could be inaugurated. Under this program the admin- 
1 native assistants would be responsible for seeing that the staff eom- 
Wlth all office procedures. The administrative assistants, further- 
!, would try to eliminate all unnecessary office procedure so that 
the workers ivould have time to plan for more patients than are cur- 
rently being serviced. Services, such as, for example, the clinic assign- 
ments where patients are handled superficial^ because of the pre 

onld be studied to enable the department to be of more help to 
mese patients and to record the services rendered more adequately. 
The case consultants in such a program would be responsible for 
aduction and orientation of all new workers taken on the staff- for 
relatively close supervision of the new workers; for case consultation to 
tfte more experienced workers; and for stimulation and staff development 
"I the workers as a whole. ' 

AGENCY RELATIONSHIPS 

In view of the fact that the staff of the Social Service Department 
is greatly limited in relation to the in-patient and out-patient popula- 
it is important that the division of responsibility between the de- 
partment and the various public and private agencies be clarified and 
defined. In this way all available medical and social resources in the 
community are utilized to the fullest extent. This is a continuous process. 

During the past year it has been possible to work out improved 
agreements with the following agencies: 

City Hospital 'for Mental Diseases 

The system for committing patients to the City Hospital for Mental 
far from satisfactory. As it was not possible to make 
an appointment with the coroner to discuss possible commitment it mean 
that a worker from the department had to wait two and three hours 
before seeing the coroner. The worker contributed nothing to ihe coroner 
"' ., c .°" M of the patient's eligibility for admission to the 

merely conveyed a prescription blank from Charitv Hos- 
pital With a notation bv the attending physician as to diagnosis and rec- 
"'nmen.iation for institutionalization. Although in the past the 1 r< ■ 



60 CHARITY HOSPITAI^1941-1942 ___^_ 

had repeatedly refused to consider a change in commitment procedure. 
it was possible to work out a new plan whereby the Social So 
partment secured both medical and social information on patient- 
whom commitment was advised and referred this data to the coro; 
writing. If the patient is accepted, the hospital ambulance secure- 
commitment blanks from the coroner's office and conveys the patie: 
the City Hospital for Mental Diseases. Within a period of three rt, 
there have been only two instances in which difficulty has arisen. 

City Department of Health— Bureau of Public Health Nursing 

An agreement, which became effective 4/15/42, has been work, 
with the City Department of Health. The Social Service Depart- 
the Bureau of Public Health Nursing plan to work jointly on casi 
report their mutual findings to each other in writing. Any patienl 
lives in New Orleans and on whom >f tuberculosis is madr 

will be referred to the Bureau of Public Health Nursing for 
care, examination of contacts and interpretation of precautions 
taken by the family. The hospital is now relieved of the examit 
<>l" the contacts of patients who have tuberculosis and who live iti 
Orleans. Patients with tuberculosis are assured follow-up and nu 
service after their return home from the hospital. 

Department of Public Welfare 

Form letters have been developed so that the number of letters e>- 
Changed between the Department of Public Welfare and the Social S 
Department can be cut down to a minimum. In this way, a full 
will be sent when the medical information and recommendations are 
pleted rather than a series of letters written giving information at , 
mediate stages. 

There has continued to be discussion of the division u i i-cspmi» 
between the hospital and the Department of Public Welfare in relai 
to tuberculosis patients. Although the Department of Public \Y, 
had stated that it could not eferrals of patients with tub- 

who had no families and who were infections, it was finally possible to «*t 
the Department of Public Welfare to agree to consider all sue!' 
regardless of whether or not they had families or were infectious. l> 
also possible to get the agency to agree to accept such pal 
hesitation provided the patient himself could find a place to 
could fix nil own meals and provided funds were available. Alt 
patients need complete bed rest, even in the hospital, as they 
on beititf ambulatory, such an arrangement does not harm the ii 
patient. It is necessary in order, however, to utilize the hospital beds i 
early, treatable cases; but the community, because of lack of beds i 
advanced cases of tuberculosis, suffers. 



Tuberculosis Study: To point up this problem it was decided in 
cember, l«j] in make a study of the patients with tuberculosis 
tinued to remain m the hospital following discharge because of i 

irres in the state. A monthly schedule is kept on each such dischanreJ 
patient untjl his actual removal from the hospital has been effected. 

The following table shows the number of patients discharged 
total number <-l .lays discharged and the cost to the hospital for t 
period 12/15/41 through 6/3(1 12. 

Number of Patients 69 

Colored j 7 

Wlnte 42 

Aggregate Number of Days Since Discharge 12,(590 
Cost of Boarding Care in the Hospital at 
$3.38 per Di 



. 



. MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE 6] 

Travelers* Aid Society 

points of policy between this department and Travelers' Aid 

a-e e D P r, C I^nfi, UP - 1 t Wh T Ver TrawlelV Aid requests it, the Social 

« Department will make arrangements for placement at the New 

means Convalescent Home for those cases accepted by Travelers' Aid 

on referral from. this department. If Travelers' Aid has* already received 

ca] information on the patient in writing, Travelers' Aid may wish 

to make the referral; but if the medical situation is complicated, or if 

^ .21 'S format '° n ? n Wrltmp is not - vet liable, it may be preferable 

^ntHome. Ct> Departm « rt t0 make the referral to the CW 

Travelers' Aid arranges return to state of residence for nati P nt<i 

Sor^o^T me , diCa . 1 ffift thiS d ^™"t wi" S end detaUednte 
nformation to Travelers' Aid for transferral to the other state' or at tho 

Sickle* Fund 

The hospital discontinued supplying Benedict's Solution to patients 

Img the Diabetic Clinic who were testing their own urine at home 

As this meant an added expense to many patients who could not afford it' 

the Sickles Fund was asked to carry Benedict's Solution. This was 

agreed to by the Sickles Fund in February, 1942, 

h„ J h< L Sic H'T ?. un<l , *£■ " ot stock many of the medications prescribed 

hospital. Gradually a few new drugs have been added at the in- 

<• of the Social Service Department. This can be done only slowly 

-aid as a result the problem of securing medication prescribed is often 

ff". T -V act ^ hat lh "r Sit u k . k ; s , Fu " d !? not easiIv accessible to {.he W 
pitaj as well as because the Sickles Fund does not fill prescriptions except 
i limited amounts often makes securing medication through the Sickle* 
more expensive than buying it at a reduced rate through a ret'dl 
"ttWTirt. Thw points up the accepted fact that the hospital needs its 
own out-patient drug dispensary. 



RELIEF 



Uthoagfa the Social Service Department does not have recognized 
relief, iunds have been made available for some medication and 
fare. These funds have been dispensed in the following way: 

Car Fare 

Dtmng the calendar year, January, 1940 to January, 1941 the Social 

Department spent approvimately $500.00 for . ,■ checks 

K the past fiscal year 6,064 car checks were used, or a total of 

• tit. These car checks, which should be used to provide car fare 

patients who eoulcl not report to the clinic or to the Sickles 

"ins filled without financial assistance, serve an 

tant purpose. But it was found that car checks were being given 

i with whom the Social Service Department was not working 

,yilr "' "ts who were active Department of Public Welfare 

anrj for whom the Department of Public Welfare would have pro- 

sary car fare, were receiving ear checks while other possible 

eea were not being explored and exhausted before the limited funds 

*Partiaan1 ware drawn on. 

mportant that clinic treatment be continued when irnii- 

"ntial that the department have a fund to provide car fare 

■ Patients who cannot provide it themselves. This money, how- 

ed carefully in order to insure that the greatest "number 



62 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1342 

of patients are benefitted, To provide for this, the following policy 
drawn up on 5/18/42: 

"Since the Social Service Department does not have fu 
it i« expected that when cases needing car checks are referred, atu 
will be made to try to secure money for car fare through a sou 
than the Social Service Department. 

Car tokens are not to be given out without consultation with 
visor. On cases which are not active with social agencies, car checks 
be available on a selective basis. Car checks are not available foi 
who are active with the Department of Public Welfare or 
social agency. 

i iasea on which car checks are supplied must be active with the 
Service Depa rtm ent, " 

Gauze 

By supplying gauze ami adhesive for dressings and by arrange 
nursing service from tin- City Department of Health, it is often 
to dii latients from the hospital earlier than would othi 

feasible. This enables the hospital to begin treatment, of anothei 
In the same way it is also possible in keep patients from return: 
the clinic several times a week for dressings. 

Then 1 are some conditions, such as colostomies, esophageal stri 
etc, which need dressings over an indefinite period. As the co.-' 
dressings bought through drug stores is prohibitive and in vie 
rom the hospital's noint of view of relieving th< 
s. the hospital has supplied gauze and adhesive t 
several years, During the calendar year, January, 1;M1 to Janunrv, 
17..;,.7 package ize, 1,.'!H7 rolls" of bandage and 694 roll 

n out to patients; while during the fiscal year ls,t;:il 
rsuae, 1 ,7'JS rolls oT atlhesiv,. and 1,06") rolls <>1 bam 

ontinuous attempt made to get the Departn* 

Public Welfare to assume responsibility for providing dressii 
clients nor had ii I rmined how long dressings should last in 

ton i" in ioui diagnoses. 

Effective G Is 12 the following policy was outlined for the <!■ 

tngl are nol to ; I out without consultation with : 

it-Is are not active with social ageit 
he available <>u a selective basis, but dressings are not avail 
path re with the Department of Public Welfare or 

n which dressings are supplied most be aetivi 

■ I Service Department. 

nga are given out, the patient or family should I 
copy of Instructions for reclaiming used gau 

Furthermore, the City Department of Health, Bureau i 
Dealt 1 supply of dressings at a greatlj 

Some of the patients will, therefore, be able to secure dressing; 

this SOU ■ 

Charity Rate Tickets 

Out of the funds available, t>5 tickets, which total !jKl.:il. we 
during the year, This permitted patients who were discharged fiv 
hospital, but for whom money HW return transportation could 
i.e. I. to he sent home. This prevented tying up a hospital bed. 



MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE 63 



The following table which includes the money spent by the depart- 
ment shows (he number of tickets paid for by patients and other agencies. 
Number paid by Patients 2.734 $3,601.1!) 

.Number paid by Agencies ... 203 432.07 

Number paid by Social .Service __ 66 84.34 



TOTM. 8 f0 02 $4,117.90 

Surgical Supplies and Appliances 

Out of the funds available, three appliances were bought for three 
and paid for by the Social Service Department at a cost of 
$16.00. 

iditional appliances and supplies as shown by the following- table 
bought by patients and by agencies for their clients under treat- 
ment in Charity Hospital : 

Number paid by Patients 15 $121,00 

Number paid by Agencies — 80 -.37 

Number paid by Social Service — :; 16.00 



TOTAL _ 98 $416.37 

SPECIAL FUNDS 

Poliomyelitis Fund 

1,1 the Polio Fund, the Crippled Children's Division, 

nunt of Health, has agreed to provide appliances for all 

of whether or not they might be eligible for the 

d, us long as they meet the requirements of "the Crippled 

division. In this way the Polio Fund can be used entirely for 

r whom no other resource is available. 

The last payment received was $5000 in April of 1938. As no addi- 
ments will be received, it is important that the fund be con- 

The total of $548.90 has been spent out of this fund during the fiscal 
present balance is $1123.76. This money has been used to pro- 
patients with braces, crutches and corrective shoes, and to Keep 
"• appliances in repi 

Special Fund 

The Social Service Department Special Fund is used to provide medi- 

tients when no other resource can be tapped. Since its 

nt in September, 1939, $67,31 has been expended. The last 

nt was $111.95 in July, 1941. This leaves a balance of $1132.69. 

'i of i Jus fund has been earmarked for use for insulin. This monev, 

been set aside so that should the insulin Fund be entirely 

m'shment not possible, patients in need of insulin can be 

led for on the same basis as at present for a period of approxi- 

i wo yea rs. 

Insulin Fund 

ilin Fund during December, 1941, was reestablished by a 
of $500, which Sister Stanislaus secured from the Lucien D. 
E. Price Foundation, This fund will be used for those 
have no other resource, such as patients who are in the 
of Public Welfare pending file. These are individuals who 
fP" itance, but who are not receiving relief be- 

nt of Public Welfare does not have adequate funds. 



64 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 



Since the Insulin Fund is not and cannot be a revolving fund, be 
the patients helped have no means of repaying the loans, it will h:s 
be used carefully. 

$136.45 has been spent out of the Insulin Fund during the fiscal vear 
and the present balance is $437.16. Since the Fund was started, fr>< 
has been used to provide 111 patients with insulin. 

COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

Members of the staff served on committees of the Council of Social 
Agencies, American Association of Social Workers and American As 
tion of Medical Social Workers, and the Tuberculosis and Public if 
Association. These committees are formed to work toward the so' 
of the many health and welfare lacks in New Orleans and the state. 
committee work is helpful not onlv for the individual worker, but for the 
hospital as well. 

As the National Conference of Social Workers met in New Oi 
this year, it was possible for the entire staff to attend the meet 
to meet well-known social work figures. This was, of course, a •■■ 
tag experience for the workers and the department as a whole. 

VOLUNTEERS 

For a number of years the Gray Ladies of the American Red Cross 
have been interested in participating in the program of this hospital, as 
they have at the Marine Hospital. Currently, because of the numl, 
volunteers interested in hospital work as a result of the war, the A 
can Red Cross has been particularly interested in expanding the 
Ladies program. 

On 3/30/42 the Gray Ladies began their orientation period in 
Social Service Department and during the latter part of May tin 
ported for assignments. Gray Ladies function in the Diabetic, Ey, 
Orthopedic Clinics and in Intake. Gray Ladies are reading to the civ 
on the pediatric wards, assisting Miss Klein in the school room and S 
Mary in Central Service. 

OTHER ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Besides defining the supervisory program and re-outlining rel. 
ships with a number of agencies, the Social Service Depart! 
been conscious of other problems and has worked toward their 
As it was impossible to secure additional steel file cabinets because < 
war, and as the file room had reached its capacity, and as there w 
additional space available, it had to be decided whether or not 
would be destroyed or whether some cases would be filed in the bast 
Because of the confidential nature of the material in the case i . 
since there was no way of locking the material to be filed in the ba*- 
it was decided to destroy cases. Beginning 1/21/42, it was 
destroy specified cases in the Social Service Department files tt; 
December, 1940. No running histories cases \« oyed but thn f 

lowing types of cases were to be destroyed: 

1. Cases containing medical information only. 

2. Correspondence in regard to unidentified patients; 
birth or age; admissions only, 

3. Personal correspondence with patient's family, 
I. Correspondence in regard to transportation only. 
6. Routine clinic follow-up letters. 

6. Requests for blood donors. 



MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE 65 



i. Reports of placement examinations for Waldo Burton Home, New 
Orleans School Board, Municipal Boys' Home. 

8. Routine reports to National Youth Administration and Child Wel- 
fare Association, when that information is contained in the medical 
record. 

As the resource file and the general file had not been gone over 
for some time, through the cooperation of the Department of Institutions 
it was possible for members of the filing division to spend a number of 
days in New Orleans reorganizing the general correspondence file The 
resource file was gone through and information out of date and of no 
value thrown away. Such material in the general file was also discarded 
t is planned to review these flics at regular intervals and to weed out all 
out-of-date or non-essential material so that they can be kept in good 
order. Literature, of which the department had a great deal was not 
accessible to the staff. Pamphlets and books have been indexed by author 
and subject so that the material is more readily available than it was 

A handbook outlining the hospital policies as well as policies of the 
£ e par n 2 indicating material on agencies in the community has 

been made up. for each member of the department. This will be of great 
value in the induction and orientation of new workers. Books showing 
the individual differences of various specialized services are also beinc 
drawn up to further help workers to adjust rapidly in the department. 

An arrangement whereby narcotics can be secured without undue loss 

"f time is also in the process of being worked out. Securing preserip- 

for narcotics for patients with incurable cancer, who are hot hospital 

patients and who are physically unable to report to the clinic or deep 

x-ray therapy, is at present a decided problem. 

Most patients with cancer in the terminal stages, who are admitted 
to the hospital, are routinely referred to Social Service to plan for their 
care at home or in an institution. When plans for care at home arc- 
made, as these patients rarely have a family physician and as there are 
no resources for home medical service in the community except on a very 
selective basis, unless prescriptions for opiates can be secured through 
the hospital, this necessary medication will not be available for these pa- 
tients; and their families, unless medication can be secured, will not agree 
to providing care at home. Since in some instances the patients live six 
us or longer, the visiting staff of the hospital has been reluctant to 
continue to furnish prescriptions without seeing the patient again. 

The Federal Bureau of Narcotics has stated that a physician may 
prescribe the minimum amount of narcotics necessary to meet the needs 
or any of his bona fide patients. Since the patients in question do not 
have a family physician or funds with which to employ a physician, the 
Federal Narcotics Bureau feels that they would be considered the bona 
fide patients of the physicians at Charity Hospital. If this meets with 
the approval of the hospital, it now remains for some person to be desig- 
nated within the hospital to write these prescriptions. It will definitely 
1« ■ known when the patients die so that the families cannot continue to 
secure prescriptions indefinitely thereafter. Through the help of the City 
iment of Health, Bureau of Public Health Nursing and this depart- 
ment, it should be possible to be reasonably sure that the narcotics are 
used for the patient and not the family. 

'Mierc are three things that the department wishes to work on in the 
►u u* : , li|,vel °P a means of statistical count which will mean more to 
tne hospital (nan the present count which is required by the United States 
(nuurens Bureau. The United States Children's Bureau figures are of 



66 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 

value for research purposes, but they do not demonstrate statistically to 
the hospital the entire work of the "department. The second is to ■ 
lish a more satisfactory means of recording. Currently records are 
either as intensive cases, which have written histories, or as correspon- 
dence cases, which consist only of letters. Because of the limited staff 
In relation to the size of the hospital, it is difficult for the workers to 
record many intensive cases. They do, however, have intensive coi. 
with a number of patients, but most of the work is recorded by means of 
correspondence. This is unsatisfactory because it is confusing and it does 
not (rive a clear picture of the situation or the patient's reaction. . 
thought, therefore, that there must be some means of working out an 
intermediary i iing. Such recording would not require 

much time but it would show individualization of the patient and 
the worker who follows the ease some appreciation of that patient's prob- 
lem. Third, the department wishes to work on an evaluation program 
for the workers. Evaluation is an integral part of any superviso 
gram, but it is one that has not been worked out in detail by any m< 
social service department in the country as yet. 

The supervisory staff has gathered a good bit of material on evalua- 
tion which is in the process of being reviewed. The next step is to worV 
out the norma of performance for this particular department. A 
is done, the supervisory staff can begin evaluating the workers on 
basis. This should be a fairer means nun than has been fori 

used. If the department can work out these norms in this program i 
will be the first department in the country to develop such a program. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Social Service Department wishes to express appreciation t 
Director uf the hospital .'iiiil to the other hospital administrators for 
Interest, Gratitude is extended to the Sisters of Charity and to all 
pita! departments fur their continued assistance and cooperatim, 

gtnent is made to the State and Local Departments of [■ 
Welfare, to the vai :;il agencies throughout the state and U 

volunteers for their help in our program. Appreciation is extende 

lupervisors and to members of the Social Service Staff who 
worked faithfully and loyally throughout the year. The depart mom w 
particularly to thank Sister Mathilde for her interest and counsel . 

Respectfully submitted, 
LOUISE MEYER, 
Director Medical Social Service Depart 
7/17/42 



NURSING DEPARTMENT 67 



REPORT OF THE NURSING DIVISION 

To the Board of Administrators and Doctor 0. P. Daly, Director 
Chanty Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans 

tlemenr 

The Nursing Division wishes to present the annual report of its 
ties for the fiscal year from July 1, 1941 to June 30, 1942. 

Even a cursory review of the activities of the Nursing Division dur- 
ing the past year reveals the effects of the World War and the influence 
°u f!f rv , atlonai Defense Program. Much has been accomplished that 
should redound to better care of patients and higher standards of nursing 
•ion, but, in the main, this report will indicate that the Noising 
division faced a very real problem this year in meeting the demands 
created by the war and in .endeavoring to maintain standards in spite of 
a constantly decreasing staff. 

The of the Nursing Division will be grouped in this report 

tiie headings of Nursing Service Division and School of Nursing, 

White coordinated, the activities of these two divisions are carried on 

mough separation of responsibility to justify separate consideration, 

NURSING SERVICE DIVISION 
The most noteworthy projects undertaken by the Nursing- Service Di- 
vision during the past year will be discussed in the following paragraphs 
in chronological order rather than in the order of their importance. 

Graduate Nurses' Residence 

In Novemli. ■ of 1941, through action of the Board of Administrators, 
.•sidence which was formerly occupied by internes and which had 
med vacant since July 1939, was converted into a residence for grad- 
nuraea employed on the staff at Charity Hospital. Many nurses 
had stated their difficulty in locating desirable living quarters close to 
the Hospital and the home was almost immediately filled. The residence 
UU :t9 rooms and can house approximately 78 nurses. 

Salary Increases 

The past reports of the Nursing Division for several succeeding years 

include a recommendation for raises in salary for subsidiary personnel. 

In December raises were given to these employees, and to many other 

members of the staff. At the present time the lowest paid employees in 

Nursing Division, the ward helpers, are receiving $45.00 monthly; 

lies are receiving $60.00. While we are grateful that these lower 

increased from $30,00 to $45,00 for women and from 

$50.00 to $60.00 for men, we wish to emphasize the fact that these salaries 

dl too low if efficiency and adequate care of patients are considered, 

rm salaries were established in December for clerical workers 

iroughout the Hospital, and members of the faculty of the School of 

Jg were also given raises in salary. The beginning salary for 

eneral staff nurses was raised at this time to make it equal to 

that or white nurses working in the same capacity. 

Civil Service 

In conformity with the requests made by the newly created Civil 

• Commission, the Nursing Division reclassified all of its employees 

"(f the past year and studied the pay plan set up by the Commission. 

*ndations regarding the pay plan have been made in view of exist- 

"u conditions and in accord with salaries paid to nurses in sim- 

potitiong in government and other civilian hospitals. 



68 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 

Defense Program 

Defense activities have occupied the attention of the Nursing S 
staff this year to a greater extent than any other projects. Con 
adjustments have been necessary because of the loss of graduate i 
and the rapid turnover among male subsidiary personnel. Between I 
1941, and the end of the fiscal year 75 nurses resigned from the 
to enter military service. This loss, together with resignations of other 
nurses to accept positions elsewhere and for other reasons, leaves u> 
a graduate nurse staff of 456 at the present time. To provide m 
care for patients, the Nursing Division has found it necessary to u 
more aides and to participate in a Works Progress Administration 
gram which will be discussed more fully in a later section of this n 

Volunteer Nurse Aides: 

U the request of the local chapter of the American National Red 
Cross Charity Hospital is participating actively in the training of \ 
teer Nurse Aides; classroom space and facilities on the wards have 
made available for the instruction of these aides, who are recruited by 
the Office of Civilian Defense. The first class was organized in January 
and to date 8 classes have enrolled. Many hours of contributed sei 
on the part of the Volunteer Nurse Aides who have completed their 4^H 
have lightened the burden of the nurses on the hospital divisions. 

First Aid Classes: 

Anticipating the need for trained First Aiders in case of actual war 
or air raids, the Nursing Division, in December, undertook the tn, 
teacning First Aid to the personnel of the various hospital departn 
Many graduate nurses had equipped themselves to teach by takini 
Instructors < nurse in First Aid under the American National Red Cross. 
Standard l-irst Aid Certificates are being awarded to approximate- 
thousand members of the hospital personnel who satisfactorily comj 
the course. 

Blackouts and Defense Committees: 

Much time was spent in drawing up plans for the hospital pr 
blackouts and city-wide blackouts scheduled at intervals tin 
months of 1942. After a series of experiments the Nursing Division 
covered that because of the physical arrangements of the hosp 
blackout could be successfully achieved with a minimum amount of «^^H 
Special attention was paid to the areas where extensive lighting 
such as the emergency Operating Rooms, Accident Department, M> 
Rooms, and Admitting Rooms. 

In addition to working out blackout plans, the Nursing Divisi. 
ganiued committees to formulate plans for the following defense activ 

1. Mapping out hospital areas of safety 

2. Evacuation of patients 

3. Handling of casualties 

4. Methods of providing nrotcction for adult patients, children 
infants during air raids 

r>. Transfer of operating rooms to safe areas of hospital k 

6. Setting up hospital emergency headquarters office 

7. Appointing of emergency squads for service in the community. ™ 
The committee reports will be submitted to the Central Ho- 

Preparedness Committee for approval and final action. 

Reclaiming of Gauze: 

As an economic measure and in view of the impossibility of secun 
and staring reserve dressings, the hospital undertook in November 



I 




Student Nurses' Home— 1939 



NURSING DEPARTMENT 69 



reclaiming of used gauze. The gauze is washed in the laundry by a special 
process and sterilized before being returned to the Gauze Room, which 
was opened in an unoccupied ward on the 9th floor. This project has 
been very successful and is worthy of comment here because it has been 
the means of storing away approximately 350,000 surgical dressings. 
W. P. a. Project 

On April 27, 1942 the Hospital entered into an agreement with repre- 
sentatives of the Works Progress Administration to place their workers 
on the hospital wards, and approximately 150 W. P. A. workers are now 
rendering service to patients as ward helpers, orderlies, or messengers 
in order to insure uniformity of methods of work throughout the Hospital 
classes were arranged for these workers. Prom the beginning, the project 
nas been very successful and has been a valuable means of supplying 
needed personnel on the floors. 

Concentration of Patients 

The continued loss of medical and nursing personnel following the 
declaration of war has thrown too heavy a burden of work on the re- 
maining staff and plans have been laid to concentrate patients into 
smaller hospital areas. The plans include the complete closing of the sixth 
and eleventh floors of the Main Hospital Building and the removal of 
these patients to the remaining occupied floors. It is also anticipated that 
in the near future one side of the Out Patient Department will of ne- 
cessity have to be closed. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The School of Nursing has also felt the effects of the nation-wide 
defense movement and has participated actively in efforts to meet the 

••ing demand for increased supply of professionally trained nurses. 
Recruitment Program 

An intensive publicity program was carried on in the fall of 1941, in 
an effort to recruit students. By means of radio, newspaper publicity, 
and wide distribution of the school circular, the need for nurses was 
broadcast far and wide throughout the South. A fair response was ob- 
tained. During the spring of 1912, the faculty of the School of Nursing 
lipated in a statewide recruiting program for students by accepting 
speaking assignments in high schools and colleges, where the national 
need for nurses was stressed. In May publicity was again commenced 
for the fall class, and applications have been coming in in large numbers. 
The School is able to accommodate at least one hundred additional stu- 
dents and plans now call for the enrollment of approximately 200 stu- 
dents during the scholastic year of 1942-1943. 

Federal Appropriation 

In July, 1941, federal money was appropriated to assist schools to 
the cost of educating additional students. The School of Nursing 
filed an application for federal funds with the United States Public 
Health Service and was granted a total of $15,201.03. This permitted us 
to offer scholarships of $150.00 each to cover entrance fees for fifty 
.idilitional students who were admitted in January of 1942. Federal funds 
were also used to finance refresher courses for inactive, registered 
nurses; thtee such courses were completed before June 30, 1942, with a 
total registration of 34 students. 

Clinical Teaching 

Although the rapid turnover and loss of trained personnel interfered 
with the staff education program as it had been planned for the year, 



70 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 



a great deal of progress was made in establishing a uniform clinical 
teaching program in the hospital departments where students are on dun- 
Like services, such as general medicine and surgery, were grouped and 
representative committees were formed of the supervisory staff in 
divisions to work out practicable teaching programs. At the same time 
committees on teaching schedules and forms, and on efficiency records pre 
pared I materials that could be used generally. The assignment of students 
for their clinical experience according to a modified block system 
perfected and a Kardex system of recording clinical services was inaugu- 
rated. During the year many nurses and supervisors enrolled in uni- 
versity courses in Ward Instruction and thereby secured the foundation 
to participate intelligently in this staff program. 

Statistics 

For the sake of comparison, statistics usually recorded for the School 
of Nursing are arranged in two columns, one showing figures quoted in 
the 1941 report and the second showing present statistics. 

STUDENTS IN SCHOOL OF NURSING: 1941 1942 

Charity Hospital students 185 227 

Affiliating students 47 91 

Post graduate students 10 "17 

Anesthesia students 21 31 

Students in five-year program 12 9 

SCHOOLS AFFILIATED WITH CHARITY 
HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Schools located in state 2 7 

Schools located out of state ,„ g g 

ADMISSIONS AND WITHDRAWALS 

Admissions to School of Nursing . 99 166 

W ithdrawals from School of Nursing 91 63 

COURSES COMPLETED 

Students graduated 66 82 

Inactive nones completing Refresher Courses :; 1 

Anesthesia students receiving certificates 31 26 
Students receiving degrees from L. S. U. 

Department of Nursing Education . _ 7 [a, 

Included in the total number of twelve nurses who were awarded de 
grees in the Department of Nursing Education are two graduates of t 
five-year Combined Academic and Basic Professional Course These 
our first two graduates in this program, which was established in 

NEW EQUIPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION WORK 

The Nursing Division acknowledges with gratitude the purch.it 
certain much needed equipment and repair and construction work 
to bring about improvements in the care of patients and the promotion < 
a better educational program for our student nurses. 

The erection of cubicles in the pediatric wards permits of bel 
nique in caring for babies and will, no doubt, help to prevent 1 
of infection, always a hazard in nursing children susceptible to cons 

Another improvement which is gratefully acknowledged is tht* 1 
vation of the Dibert Memorial Building and the installation <> 
plumbing fixtures which have permitted us to institute safer nursinj- 






NURSING DEPARTMENT 71 



cedures in the building. Student nurses will soon be assigned to this Unit 
to secure experience in nursing of Tuberculosis patients. 

A diet laboratory, long needed to teach student nurses the practical 
application of the principles of nutrition and diet therapy, is under con- 
struction at the present time, and when completed, will enable us to give 
proper training in this fundamental phase of a nurse's preparation. 

Sixteen microscopes were purchased this past year. This equipment 
has greatly facilitated the teaching of student nurses, and we gratefully 
acknowledge the action of the Board in providing these necessary teaching 
aids in the School of Nursing. 

The federal appropriation mentioned before also permitted the pur- 
chase of large oscillating fans for the library and. classrooms as well as 
office furniture and equipment. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 
In closing, we wish to recommend the following: 

1. Furtherance of plans for the protection of the hospital in case 
of air raid or sabotage. 

2. Purchase of screens for the wards to insure privacy for patients. 
8. Equipment of a Huitable premature station for the care of pre- 
mature infanta. 

4. Salary increases for subsidiary workers. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Nursing Division is appreciative of the interest and solicitude 
so constantly manifested by the Board of Administrators and by the Di- 
rector of the Hospital and gratefully acknowledges the many favors 
bestowed upon the Department. Appreciation is also expressed to the 
Assistant Clinical Directors wJiose generous assistance has made it pos- 
sible to work out many problems this past year. We are grateful to all 
who have contributed to the promotion of the physical welfare of our 
nurses, both graduates and students, and to the furtherance of the edu- 
cational program for our students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SISTER HENRIETTA, R. N„ Director 
School of Nursing and Nursing Service 



72 



CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 



CONTAGIOUS UNIT 



YEARLY REPORT JULY 1941 TO JULY 1942 



DISEASES 


CASKS 

VDUITTKu 


DISCHARGED 


DESEHTKIl 


DEATHS 




n in n 


COL 


WHIT I- 


COL. 


warn 


COL. 


Anthrax . 


4 
67 
00 

III 

146 
B 
218 
376 
123 
64 

102 

20 

6 
38 

55 
10 
IS 
86 
25 
62 
1 i 

117 


4 

;to 

2<\ 

3 

51 

24 

1 

55 

i in 

39 

2fl 

28 

11 

3 

24 

18 
6 

8 

151 

6 

13 

184 












C lnckrll 1'ox 


36 

L's 

3 

9 
114 

1 

1 is 

846 

28 

25 

115 

B 

3 

1(1 

36 

2 

7 

30 

6 

56 

29 

190 


1 








Diphtheria 
Encephalitis. . 


1 


2 

■J 




Erysipelas 

Hi e ( '. 


4 

3 




I 






Hansen's Disease. 
Lues 


1 


2 
5 


10 

3 


i 

IS 




Meningitis 


1 


Mumps .. 


3 




IVrh: 




2 




Poliomyelitis 








Paratyphoid . 










Scarlet Fever 


2 


1 


2 




Streptococcus (Sore 

Tliti 
Tracheotom 




-■ 




I'lilarrmia. 








Typhoid 






2 




Typhus Fever 








Vaginitis. 


I 
4 


4 


15 




Vincent's Angina 
Suspected of contagious 
diseases 


1 


Total 


I.HS7 


T;;s 


Ins., 


25 j:>, 


46 


69 



Signed S. Fabhegas, 

Supervisor, Contagious Unit 



REPORT OF DIETARY DEPARTMENT 73 

REPORT OF DIETARY DEPARTMENT 



To the Board of Administrators and Doctor O. P. Daly, Director, 
Charity Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans. 

Gentlemen : 

The Annual Report of the Dietary Department for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1, 1941 and ending June 30, 1942, is respectfully sub- 
mitted: 

The Dietary Department has continued services to the Hospital with- 
out any major changes this year, A few needed equipment changes have 
been made or planned, however. 

Tin- student nurses' laboratory has been provided and equipped in the 
Medical Building. It will be ready for use in the fall term. In it the 
nurses will be able to get the practical experience they need both in the 
nutrition and diet therapy classes. 

Exhaust fans in the nurses' dining room and floor fans in the em- 
ployees* dining room have helped to- relieve ventilating problems to a great 
extent 

A complete inventory system for food cost control is a long desired 
to the department. In a kitchen as large as this one, control is nec- 
essary for true economy. Our records now can be kept up to date and in 
the event of rationing, will be a real aid. 

Plans have been made to provide a larger dining room for colored 
nurses and employees, in what is now the Purchasing Department. This 
is a much needed project as the dining room facilities provided for col- 
ored personnel have always been inadequate. 

Plans have also been made to provide a new dishwashing machine for 
the main kitchen. The present machine is in poor condition, and the dish 
load is too large for this type of machine. 

The department served 1,380,241 meals to personnel and 2,280,933 
Weals to patients, making a total of 3,661,174 meals served. Of (his total 

188 were special diets, such as allergy, hland, low residue, diabetic, 
etc. In addition to these special diets 328,120 bottles and 8,149 quarts of 
special formulae were prepared in the Formula Room. 

We are grateful to our Director, and the Board of Administrators 
for their interest and assistance this past year. Gratitude is also extended 
\riy. Doctors, Nurses, and all Departments for their cooperation, 
interest and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SISTER EUPHEMIA, 
Director, Dietary Department 



1* CHARITY HOSPITAL-1941-19A3 



DEPARTMENT OF ALLERGY 



August 28, 19 

To the Board of Administrators of Charity Hospital 
1528 Tulane Avenue 
New Orleans, Louisiana. 
Gentlemen : 

the iast b ^ t ™, my »,^ POrt J f0 / the - vear e " din * Jun * 30, 1942: Durinp 
varies A^ies ^ a " d 4848 c ° Iored P atient * were ^ated for [ho 

P atie 1 nt S W wl%TilL.!H l0 ; r n eC lh neW ^7** *?#!* direct| y: «« other n,w 
fr.,m rt„ , t ,ncmdt ' d ln tn e general totals because they were re 
from the van,, ,. e8 to have their MlBtgin d^S a *d coSteK 

help A in th t e aX r nr an d rm e S on fr n H |lerfri \ S enc ? unt <^ P^ved of wonderful 

n«- Be . s t idea * he . usu al hyposensitizinp extracts by injection oral medica- 
tion with enteric coated pills was applied with favoTble ? eS ulS 

over^ S]'!?K' the 3rd 3te E in . ex P" iments ">«* in the dink 
ttC*a£J^^^S%£? by V ° 1Unteer Students and estab " 

app P 4ialio n n o f the e ir e h P elp. ,mentS ™ d th ' S ° Ccasl0n ia take " to «J 

thei^Suatt^^ t0 "* Henr >' °* t,e " «* ^ Shushan for 

Respectfully submitted, 

NARCISSE F. THIBERGE, M. D., PhB 
Chief of Clinic. 



REPORT OF STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 



76 



REPORT OF THE STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 

July 1st, 1941 to June 30th, 1942 

ADMISSIONS BY PARISHES 



lia 

Allen 


129 

80 


No Home. 

N :itchitoches 

Other States 

Ouachita .. 

Pointe Coupee 

Rapides . . 

Red River _ _ . . _ . 


31 
32 


ion 


746 


33,043 


ption 




517 

358 
7 
6 


170 
60 

ill 
399 


icgard.. _ 
Caddo 


42 
19 
301 
32 
12 
28 
4 


180 

2 


Calcasieu 

ton . _ 

ml i 


Richland 

Sabine 

St Bernard 

St. Charles 

St. James 


29 
31 

575 

523 

635 


rdia 


51 
9 

2,002 
270 


St. John the Baptist 


734 




St. Helena 


101 


ii Rouge 

Feliciana 


St. Landry _ . . 

St. Mary 

St. Martin 

Tangipahoa 

Terrebonne 

Tensas 

Union - . 

Vermilion. 


396 

548 


roll 

1 tc 

lid _ 

Foreign ._ 

'•rant 


108 
91 

67 

7 

40 

386 


78 
1,219 
1,527 

1,380 

46 

10 


lie... . 
Jackson _ _ 


645 

8 


33 

152 




3,303 


Vernon 

West Baton Rouge 


24 


Davis 


138 

125 

1,113 

26 
813 

12 


1,134 
15 

215 


He ... 


West Carroll 


61 


Livingston.. 


West Feliciana . 


1ST 




Winn 

Total... ... 


21 




34 


.5.I4S 



Residence at time of admission 

City 33,048 

Louisiana 21,864 

Other States 170 

Foreign 7 

No Home 31 

I'n known 33 



Total .55.148 



76 



CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 



REPORT OF THE STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 

July 1st, 1941 to June 30th, 1342 

DEATHS WITHIN 3S HOURS OF ADMISSION 



Patients 1>ikd in 

MONTHS 

1941 



July- 

August 

September 

October 

November 
December 

1942 

January 

February 

March . 

April 

May . 

June 



Total. 



12 Houhs 



39 
39 

17 

34 

41 

30 

43 
2ti 
32 
:;i 

4x 
33 



452 



24 Horns 



22 
22 
12 
12 
12 
16 

26 

19 
25 

is 
14 
16 



214 



36 Hours 



11 

11 
6 

6 
9 
5 

8 
12 
8 
8 
7 
6 



97 



TOTAL 



72 
66 

51 

77 

60 
89 
Bl 






DEATHS 



MONTHS 



1941 
July.... 

August , 

September 

October 

inber 

December 

1942 

January.. 

February. 

March 
April . 

May 

June 

Total 



.V.! 

ss 

57 
38 
52 

17 

75 
.VI 
4S 
48 
51 
36 



628 



WHITE 



I I 
12 

7 

8 

8 

1 I 

6 
9 
7 
10 
9 
8 



liiii 



31 

12 
32 
■jr. 
26 
32 

32 

;ii 
17 

21 
29 



38] 



g 

a 

10 
s 
6 

a 

15 

7 
7. 
!) 

t 



7s 



< 



112 
116 

we. 

79 
92 

93 

119 
I Or. 

1(17 

LOO 

88 
79 



119(3 



COLORED 



56 

71 
69 
52 
59 
59 

50 

55 
65 
48 
57 
39 



UNO 



17 

31 

22 

1 

23 

IS 

25 

7 
19 

12 

IS 
111 



226 



it; 

n; 

ii 
19 

41 

27 
II 
17 
17 



609 



20 

11 

9 

13 

7 

It 
in 



164 












REPORT OF STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF THE STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 

July 1st, 1941 to June 30. 1942 

MONTHLY STATEMENT 



MONTHS 



m 

- 'i, 
< P 

= s. 

- _ 

* < 



< o 



z 


a 





© 


— i 


« 


31 


a 




B 


a 


o 


a 


EO 


< 


a 



■I, 

3 
ee 

a 

a 

3 

c 



1941 
Wy 

Uigust 

'■ tober 

nbcr_ 

1942 

iy. . . 
iry 

"Iirch 

Total 



73,45 
72.Sf.l-. 

67,215 
70,044 

66,815 
61,277 



64,215 
60,771 
68,445 
66,333 
68,166 
62,555 



2,368 

2,350 
2,240 
2,268 
2,227 

I. '171', 



2.(171 
2,170 
2,207 
2,211 

2, Mis 
2,l)K-| 



5,631 
5,419 

5,021 
4.935 

1.117 

:i.'ts:! 



l.r.ii-i 

.'i.SNN 
1,622 

4,330 
1,202 
1,067 



5,371 
6,304 

■1,6611 
4,800 
4,206 
4,250 



3,936 

3,691 
4,381 
:i.!)70 
4,219 

4,220 



25 1 
292 
261 
198 
236 
207 



2 IS 
218 
230 
211 
221 
191 



576 
.V.HI 
562 
664 
Bflfl 
516 



551 
i7^ 
479 
101 
319 

■Mi!) 



802,159 



2ii,:;iil 



."..-., M< 



53,025 



2764 



5961 



31 

23 
23 

26 
23 
23 



26 

17 
16 
12 
L9 

I I 



253 



67 
73 
74 

72 
71 
87 



79 

76 
65 
71 
72 
71 



ssi 



COMPARATIVE TABLEAU 



-July lit, 1940 to June 30th, 1941 

64,762 

-.61,650 

3,148 

6,044 

_ 855 

s!.6,323 
ly Average 2,466 



July 1st, 1941 to June 30th, 1942 

Admissions ."..">, I 1 B 

1 )ischarges 53,025 

Deaths 2,764 

Births 5,961 

Stillbortis. 253 

Coroner's Cases 881 

Hospital Days .802,159 

Daily Average 2,196 



78 



CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 



REPORT OF THE STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 
July 1st, 1941 to June 30th, 1942 
ADMISSIONS 
WHITE 



MONTHS 


MALES 


BOYS 


FEMALES 


QIBLS 


TOTAL 


11141 
July 


808 
79S 

Us7 
702 
622 
612 

682 
531 
iit><> 
712 
616 
578 


378 
354 
329 
311 
242 
217 

197 
223 
252 

m 

268 

247 


1.173 

1,080 
044 

925 
7S6 
672 

804 
7;j;i 
865 
812 
771 
787 


816 
292 
289 

24 1 
179 
184 

178 
ITS 
ISO 
17! 
197 
178 




August 


September 

October. 


NovemU-t 

December . 

1942 

January. 

February. 


March 


April 


May 

June . 




Total 


8,011 


3,205 


10,318 


2,583 


24. 



COLORED 



MONTHS 



1941 

July --- 

August 

September-. 
Octob< 

November. . . 

1042 

January .. 

February 

March .. 

April .. 

May. _ 

June 

Tutu 



M * LB8 



117:"! 

642 
642 
620 

r.ss 
549 

538 

1107 
643 
810 
558 



7.3.-..S 



BOYS 



.-..111) 



FEMALES 



m 


1,427 


479 


1,380 


463 


1,277 


til 


1,280 


435 


1,209 


401 


1,037 


478 


1,206 


861 


1,001 


429 


1,270 


334 


I,17:j 




1,085 


431 


1,051 



n,m.-> 



GIRLS 



369 
397 
390 
106 

386 

311 

368 
327 
303 

297 
282 

2(17 



4.158 



TOTAL 






White Male Adults. . . 8,01 1 

3,205 

White Female Adults 10,318 

Whin- Girls.. ... 2,583 



Colored Male Adults. .. 

Colored Boys 

Colored Female Adults. 
Colored Girls 



Total 



24, 

Grand Total. . 



17 



- 
Total 



56,148 



REPORT OF STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 



79 



REPORT OF THE STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 
July 1st, 1941 to June 30th, 1942 
Age Groups of Patients Expired 



WHTTE 



Under 1 year 
1 to 
5 to 
10 to 



• i (rears 

10 years 

15 years 

20 ygars 

ars 

30 yoars 

40 years 

50 years 

60 years 

80 ycars_ 

90 years 

90 to 100 years 

ITS and Upward. 
Unknown 



IS (.» 

20 to 

30 to 

111 in 

BQ it. 
80 to 



IS 

« 

2 
2 
2 

3 
8 

-s 

1 1 
11 

7 


I 



Total-. Ill IIS 10:* 77 93 97 121105105 101 96 751109 



10 
2 
1 
1 

2 

5 
4 
10 
12 
20 
l-l 

10 








11 

4 

2 

1 
2 

G 

2 


13 

12 
32 
3 






s 



139 
22 

22 
16 
26 
38 
42 
88 
140 
194 

71 
I 


14 



Age Groups 


of Patients Expired 












I.ORBD 


- 
6 


» 

b 
o 
P 


M 
B 

n 

S 
p 

H 

0. 
.- 
OS 


M 
a 

« 
O 
H 
O 



U 

s 
a 

o 
z 


a 
a 
;= 

B 
S 

a 


M 

p 

< 


P 

= 


a 
o 

M 


5 

■< 


>• 
< 


a 
z 
p 




ft 


Under 1 year.. . 


35 

2 

2 

2 

4 

5 

9 

16 

21 

20 

22 

1 





1 


50 
5 
2 
2 

f. 
9 
6 

[S 

14 
26 
3fi 
2 
1 

1 


34 
1 
1 

3 

7 

10 

8 

28 
15 
29 
IS 
2 
1 


1 


21 
3 

2 

3 

I 

5 

S 

21 

21 

12 

23 

I 








30 
S 
1 
1 

5 
4 
12 
IS 
15 
11 

3.S 

2 






21 
3 
1 
2 

3 
4 

15 

21 

19 

21 







11 


30 
3 
1 
3 

4 

4 

4 

13 

21 
19 
32 
'•■i 





IS 

2 


1 

3 
6 

1 

17 
21 
20 
11 




4 


25 

2 

2 
2 

8 

3 

in 

g 

18 
34 
2 


8 


15 
3 

1 

1 

2 

6 

2 

22 

17 

18 

19 



1 



3 


24 

3 





6 

10 

3 

22 

20 

11 

20 

1 



1) 

3 


23 
3 

3 

1 

4 

7 

6 

11 

12 

21 

21 

1 








326 


1 to 


35 
15 


10 to 15 year-. 


24 




• yean . 


43 

77 


to 30 years 


69 


IS 


■>■>, 


IS 


?m 


years... 


?,27 




■NT 


''0 years. 


15 




3 


ars and upward 

I tiknnwn 




16 






Btal. 


1 1(1 


177 


158 




i IK 


11(1 


127 


113 


125 


110 


125 


116 


L565 



Autopsies in bold face. 



ANKUAL REPORT OF MEDICAL RECORDS 
July 1, 1941 through June 30, 1942 



LIBRARY 



Radium Room 

.-rvatton Room. 

Medicine . 

Neurology 

Dermatology 

Contagious 

Pediatrics 

Urology 

Surgery 

Dental Snrgerj 

Fracture. 

Orthopedics 

Ophthalmology 

Otolaryngology 

Gynecology... 

Obstetrics.. 

Borns . . . 
• r< 



i 



K 

- 
- 



1 

1 
I 



= 



- 
- 

s 
S 



365 

7781 

1004 

880 

1396 

2197 
2640 
9661 
253 
KO.'i 
2355 
1803 
3480 
4520 
7520 
5175 



165 

34 

3166 

11.' 

IDS 

•!li7 

881 

1025 

3702 



320 

1034 

730 

1482 

1767 

3331 

233$ 



119 

30 

3 1 64 

382 

148 

513 

806 

1046 

3709 



259 

875 

580 

1057 

1776 

2947 

2056 



u 




c 




-1 


< 


s 




< 


^ 




s 


m 


i 


•- 


W 


ti 


u 




E 


. 


a 


z 



81 

28| 

tin 

210 
11 
416 
511 
579 

2260 
263 
224 
456 
293 
921 
977 

1242 
781 
106 



191 

42 

3798 

882 

1 

638 

903 

1165 

Hi'.m 

136 

500 

1317 

718 

1895 

1953 

2162 

1 156 



174 

50 

3963 

4 22 
171 

887 
1294 

1 IM 

4665 

117 

303 

1038 

885 

L58S 

2567 

3719 
KJ2 



= 
j - 

h N 

- a 
B 



91 
56 

4217 

562 

190 

7-'! 

1240 

2076 

684 1 

116 

481 

1450 

891 

1. -,>.-, 







274 
36 

36 1 1 

442 

170 

(171 

957 

57:i 

1320 

138 

322 

905 

712 

1876 

1520 

7820 

2648 

301 



1711 
4 

:ti(i 

17 

22 

66 

130 

1358 

626 ! 

138 

330 

739 

861 

2227 

222:; 

1442 

2 



5 

1 

359 

36 

8 

24 

44 

64 

331 

3 

22 

59 

36 

42 

108 

79 

6 





W464 
( 1026 



32 
4 

121 
16 

127(1 
430 

22 

7 

s 

101 

44 

151 

54 

93 

42 

192 

164 

2 



36 



29 

1 





15 

7 

66 

27 

14 

12 

100 

71 





DO 



u 


14 


5 





3 


1 


41 


42 


37 


A 


7 


5 


513 


.105 


258 


208 


144 


78 


20 


26 


17 


9 


7 


6 


5 


2 





4 


1 





44 


35 


22 


19 


14 


11 


51 


60 


40 


14 


21 


17 


37 


26 


30 


19 


12 


11 


187 


173 


132 


70 


61 


33 


1) 





2 











14 


12 


10 











15 


10 


i 





1 








() 














5 


6 


4 


3 


1 


3 


24 


30 


12 


13 


10 


4 


G 


9 





5 


7 





43 


to 


17 


26 


37 


8 


66 


68 





s 

3 
CO 

*— l 

> 

r 



Autopsies in bold face. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF MEDICAL RECORDS LIBRARY 
July 1, 1941 through June 30, 1942 



DBA! 

Due to Cardiovascular 

disease 

Due to Malignancy 

Due to Tuberculosis 

Due to Renal disease 

Due to Poison, accidents, 

and violence, . _. 
White 



Colored 

Male 

Female 

Still Borcis-.. 



162 
277 
305 

151 

181 
1193 

384 
1571 

623 

Kins 

594 

1156 

418 

246 



66 
112 

lit 

■is 

53 

419 
133 
640 
245 
til •> 
225 
447 
1S3 
91 



- 

< 
- 

6 



46 

115 

1411 

71 

66 

1M 
164 
698 
266 
HIM 
237 

193 
102 



50 
50 
21 
32 

62 
290 

87 
333 
117 
372 
132 
251 

72 

53 



X 



55 
142 
112 

87 

110 



10 

135 

Hi:; 
84 

71 



75 
153 
189 

81 

11D 



65 



181 



87 

121 

116 

70 

62 



I43l 103 



i. 
z 

- 






v. 
a 



; a 
z 






e- m 
t o 

j- 



< 
- 
p 
f- 



n 



I 

S 



O 
W 

O 

W 

M 
O 
O 
P0 

© 



03 
- 
> 

w 



Respectfully submitted, 

SHI-LEY H. MeCAFFRKY. 
Acting Record Librarian. 



CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 



OPERATIONS 

July 1, 1940 — June 30, 1941 







< Operating 


Accident 


Cystos 






Rooms 


Rooms 


Rooms 


July.. 




IM7 


5046 


286 


August 




18S8 


5297 


294 


September . 




l.st IS 


4792 




Octobi 




1 887 


1 124 




November 




U1S7 




December 




1434 


3773 


198 


January .. 




171s 


4049 




February . 




IfiSS 


3767 


243 


March 




1796 


3S96 


280 


April 




17 is 




247 


Mav 




is::i; 


1863 


197 


June. 




1825 


5012 


249 


Total 


21200 


53072 


2994 






Eye 


Ear, Nose & 


t'Uistcr 






Rooms 


Throat Rooms 


Rooms 


July.. 




141 


i.-,t; 


267 


August 




138 


4^7 




itlbcr. 




105 


363 




Octobei 




122 


361 




Novembei 




94 




December 




M 


269 


306 


laiiimrv 




100 


107 








86 


73 


262 


March. 




137 


170 


321 


April . 




128 


171 


308 








204 


313 


June. 




117 


L99 




Total.. 


1379 


3035 


3767 








Bronchoscopic 










Rooms 






July 




65 










66 






September 




73 






October 




56 










7! 






December 




66 






lailtKt: 




66 






February 




/ < 






March 




78 






April 




77 






May.. .. 




63 






June 




58 





Total 78# 

The Department of Anesthesia is reporting on all adminisl 



OPERATIONS, ACCIDENTS, ETC. 



YEARLY REPORT 

of 

12th FLOOR OPERATING ROOMS 

July 1, 1941— June 30, 1942 



83 



CASES 

Mites Operating Room 5493 

Delgado Operating Room 5799 

Throat Room 2630 

R °°ni l34g 

Hronchoscopic Room 902 

fluster Room 3296 

'senpic Room ........ 2561 

Accident Room — 

WWte. 303ti5 

Colored. .. 26795 57100 



OPERATIONS 

9405 

10327 

2630 

1345 

902 

156 






22026 



24765 



84 



CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 



July. 

August 

September. 

iicr.. 
November 
Decern bur 
Januarj 
February 
March 

April 

May 

June 



Total 



July 

August 

September 

October 

NovemliLi 
December 
January 
February. . 
March 

April 

May 
June 



Total. 



OPERATIONS 
July 1, 1941— June 30, 1942 



July 

August 
Kept. 
October 
November 
December. 
January. . 
February.. 
Ma fell 

April 

May 

June 

Total. 



Operating 


Accident 


Cystoscopic 


Rooms 


Rooms 


Rooms 


2014 


5680 


275 


1984 


5739 


280 


1883 


6386 




1V2S 


5242 




1363 


4371 


199 


1369 


-HMO 




152a 


3989 




1 183 


3595 


180 


1610 


4446 




1 .-,; ; 1 


4(509 




1613 


IM1 


1SS 


1528 


5233 




19732 


57160 


2561 


Bye 


liar, Nose & 


IHu 


Rooms 


Throat Room; 


■ 


142 


422 




122 


373 




103 


339 




137 


328 




92 


174 




78 


107 




124 


92 




101 


103 


216 


112 


127 




131 


n;i 




92 


203 




111 


203 


26 1 


1345 


2i ;:-;<) 

Bronchostopic 
Rooms 
79 
76 
64 
74 


3296 
















72 






97 

78 

70 
74 
71 
72 
78 

































902 



REPORT OF PHARMACIST 85 

REPORT OF PHARMACIST 

July 1, 1942 



Dr. O. P. Daly, Director 
Charity Hospital of Louisiana 
New Orleans, Louisiana 

Dear Doctor -Daly : 

The following is the report of the Pharmacy Department for the 
year ending June 30, 1942: 

Special Prescriptions filled 54 004 

Narcotic Prescriptions tilled. 6013 

Slock Prescriptions filled.. 113,433 

Total _ 173,450 

SERUMS AND ANTITOXINS PURCHASED 

Anti-Anthrax Serum 50 cc gg v j a [ s 

Ami- Haemophilus Influenza Serum Diagnostic type 3-. ././.'... 24 tube's 

Anti-Influenza Serum Type 3_. _ 10 vials 

Ami-Influenza Serum __ '."'.'.Y.'.Y.'.'.'.Y. 125 vials 

Ami-Mi. nitigococcic Serum 13 v i a ls 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 1—20,000 Units .""'.'. 90 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Scrum Type 2— 20,000 Units 20 vials 

Auti- 1'iH'iimococcic Serum Type 3 — 20,000 Units .. 70 vials 

Anti- Pncumocoecic Serum Type 4 — 20,000 Units "Z1 45 vials 

A mi- 1'neumococcic Serum Type 5 — 20,000 Units-- -./..... 25 vials 

Ami 1'iuumococcic Serum Type fi — 20,000 Units 30 vials 

AiuiPneumococcic Serum Type 7—20,000 Units. . 80 vials 

Anti-1'ncumococcic Serum Type 8 — 20,000 I nits . 33 vials 

A m i-Pneumococcic Scrum Type S— 50,000 Units. ...." 4 vials 

Ami- Pneuinococcic Serum Type 9 — 20,000 Units 59 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 10 — 20,000 Units 15 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 11—20,000 Units 10 vials 

Anti- 1'neumococcic Serum Type 12—20,000 Units 70 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 13 — 20,00(1 Units „ 10 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Scrum Type 14 — 20,000 Units _ 10 vials 

umococcie Serum Type 15—20,000 Units 10 vials 

Anii-Pneumoeoccic Serum Type IS— 20,000 Units. .. 53 vials 

Amil'iieumococcic Serum Tvpe 19—20,000 I 14 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Tvpe 20- 20,000 Units. . . 10 vials 

Ami- 1'neumococcic Serum Type 20—20,000 Units. . 24 vials 

Auti-l'mumococcic Scrum Type 31 — 20,000 Units 12 vials 

Ami 1'neumococcic Serum Tvpe 31—50,000 I 6 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 33 — 20,000 Units 10 vials 

Ann Tularemic Serum _ _ 10 vials 

Ami Wiiiti Polyvalent Snake Bite 19 vails 

Ami Venom [Hack Widow Bite 1 vails 

Catarrhal Vaccine _ " 50 vials 

I Vaccine 20 cc 7 vials 

■• Antitoxin 10,000 Units 2fl0 vials 

Diphtheria Antitoxin 20,000 Units - 266 vials 

D.ptatberui Toxoid_ 15 vials 

ivrysiiK-las Vaccine Q vials 



86 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 _^ 

Furunculosis Vaccine 5 cc 80 < 

Gas Gangrene Antitoxin IQO 

Gonococcus Vaccine I v ; a i 

Enumme Globulin 10 ce ,15 

Mcningococeic Antitoxin.. . 210 

Mixed Vaccine Influenza . . . .. 95 violl 

Mixed Vaccine Respiratory Infections , 2fi. 

Mocassin Snake Venom 1/3000 j;, 

Pertussis Vaccine l_> v .-.; 

Scarlet Fever Antitoxin Therapuetic _>•_> 

Small Pox Vaccine V-5 Tubes of 5 Points each . r ,.-,~ 

Staphylococcic Antitoxin 20,000 Units _ 27; 

Staphylococcic Toxoid .. .. Q{\ 

Streptococcic Vaccine ... \\ , 

Tetanus Antitoxin 1,500 Units 21 ,00! i 

Tetaxun Antitoxin 10,000 Units cjq 

Tetanus Antitoxin 20,000 Units 17 

Tetanus Gas Gangrene 2,200 viali 

Tetanus Toxoid 

Typhoid Bacterin Mixed 

Typhoid H Antigen 2 cc. 

Typhoid Vaccine for Fever Therapy. . 

Typhoid Vaccine 2cc__ 

Ty lipoid Vaccine 20 cc . 

Undulant Fever Vaccine 5cc . 

ARSPHENAMINES PURCHASED 

Bismarstn .2 gram without Sol _ 9,500 

Mapharsen .4 gram (10 dose amp.). . 

Mapharsen .6 gram (10 dose amp. )_ _. 

Neo arsephenamine .3 gram I 

j\eo arsephenamine .45 gram _. 600 

Neo arsephenamine .6 gram inn 

Neo arsephenamine 3,00 gram 5.;. 

Neo arsephenamine 4.5 gram 

Sulpharsphenamine .2 gram 400 

Trvparsamide 50.0 gram 20 b<- 

INSULIN PURCHASED 

Insulin U-20-10"cc 100 via;? 

Insulin U-40-10 cc 12 

Insulin llOcc. ■}() 

Insulin U-100-10 cc 

Crystalline Zinc Insulin U-40-10 CC . . ] ;,, 

Protamine Zinc Insulin U-40-10 cc ._ 1, 300 

Respectfully submitted, 
A. P. Lauve, 
A PL. J. Chief Pharmacist. 



REPORT OF HOSPITAL GUILD k? 



REPORT OF CHARITY HOSPITAL GUILD 
July 1st, 1941 to June 30th, 1942 



Amputation sponges - _ , fi7 ^ 

Centra! service sponges . . ._ __ 834918 

C 20 4 xl. : ^g 

Kptex „__ ,t'*z: 

Mesh Gauze ____ ~~ 1MB 



»«m „o» _ _ 12 02 

uiade cases __„ . 00 

Needle cases — __ »|| 

Lap -sixes ___' 91 ___ 



"»F-sixes -it erj 

Cigarette drains ~ 21„ 

Thread cards , n™ 

Perineals . " J'Jg 

Tracheotomy pads g',™ 

Tracheotomy tape _ „ 'ogr 

Or. Nelson's tampons , ,05 

Tonsil tampons — tt'vnv 

ile cotton - _ b_A£ 

Cotton balls . __ ______ ___ 1,308,893 

wjilu pads _. . 76319 

Iodoform pads - - 2 844 

Compressed dressings ________________ 190112 

Ey * P„ ds , — — 5,054 

Ta^s ' " 236 ' 601 

Tongue blades ZZZZZ ~ ~~ 2 ™'lf A 

l'r. Owens, Compressed dressing 1 --.. 

Rubber dams _____ ^Jg 

Blood transfusion boards .„_ __ fiKfi 

Baby bands ____. 28 

8 _n^ in !_J___ — — • 5 > 685 

Haldn T_£__ : ■— 8B7 H) 

Strips - ——— — ~ — ^1 

Gall bladder rolls _ | 

Dr. Owens surgical dressing 10 

Rubber bands . 6B .q% 

Mastoid dressing. "" ___ ' 206 

Dr. Owens plain gauze , __ j 145 



Total ___ ____ 6333,835 

448 meetings, attendance 6,359. 



88 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1941-1942 

OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 
Sister Stanislaus is Honorary President for life. 

President Mrs. C. Warren Gilmc 

1st Vice-President- ________ — ______ Mrs. J. T. Hey den 

2nd Vice-President — Mrs. W. S. ,\ 

3rd Vice-President — Mrs. L. D. Barrets 

4th Vice-President — — — Mrs. C. J. Brauncr 

Our Treasurer, Miss G. McCay is laid up with a broken hip so Miss Sarah 
Palfrey is Acting Treasurer. 

Recording Secretary ___.._____ __ — __~ Miss Sarah Palfrey 

Corresponding- Secretary — -— Miss Adele Reynauc 

Publicity Chairman . Mrs. H. E. K 

BOARD MEMBERS 
Mrs. R. Lusher Mrs. N. J. Khoury Mrs. E. J. Nests* 

LADIES IN CHARGE OF MEETINGS 

Monday, a.m., Mrs. W. S. Amoss and Mrs. Alice Wilson. 

Monday, p.m., Mrs. N. J. Khoury. 

Tuesday, a.m., Mrs. J. Schoen. 

Tuesday, p.m.. Mrs. R. Lusher, Mrs. R. Chevis, Mrs. D. F. Harriso... 

D. N. Barr, Mrs. E. W. McLean and Mrs. M. H. Jameison. 
Wednesday, a.m., Mrs. P. Jansen and Mrs. F. Volchmarin. 
Wednesday, p.m., Mrs. L. Bertucci and Mrs. B. Washastrom. 
Thursday, a.m., Mrs. C. J. Brauner, Mrs. L. Papoutge and Mrs. H. C 
Thursday, p.m., Mrs. E.J. Nester and Mrs. Chas. Chehardy. 
Friday, a.m., Mrs, L. D. Barrett and Mrs, J. D. Nix. 
Saturday a. m. is Scout morning with Mrs. N. J. Khoury in charge. 

NAMES OF GROUPS ASSISTING IN GUILD WORK 

Various Groups, A.R.C.; Various Groups, A.W.V.S.; Also quit*, 
ladies take work home, 

(i umbel Girls— Gumbel Home; St. Margaret's Daughters; 
American Club; Touro-Shakespeare Home; Les Quarante Ecoliere.- 
bouin School; Miss Theodora Giovengo; F.H.A. Projects; Sevt-.n • 
Adventists; Christ Church; St Andrews Church; St. Anthony" 
Salem Evangelical Church; Canal St. Presbyterian Church; St. ( 
Ave. Christian Church; Central Baptist hurch; Coliseum Baptist Cl 
Prytania Presbyterian Church; Gentilly Presbyterian Church; - ; 
Evangelical Church; Bethany Evangelical Church; Parker M, 
Church; American Needlework Guild No. 16. 

Scout Troops: 19, 78, 25, 47, 32, 34, 1, 21, 22, 26, 41, ■".. 12, 
16, 18, 1.5, 27, 11, 31. 



INDEX 



Board of Administrators 

Form of- Gilt or Bequest 

Donors to Children's Bed Endowment Fund 

Departmental Staffs .____ 



Resident, Intern and Visiting Staffs 
Report of Vice-President (Biennial) 
Report of Director (Biennial I 
Report of Director (Statistical) 

Report of Accounting Department 

Report of Pathological Department 

Report of X-Ray Department -.... 

Report of Heart Station 



Report of Physical Therapy Department. 
Report of <>ut-Patient Department 
Report of Anesthesia Department . 



Repot 1 tof Medical Social Service Department 

Report oi Nursing Department 

Report of Contagious Department „___ 

Report of Dietary Department 

Report of Allergy Clinic 

Report of Medical Records Library— 

Report of Operating Rooms 

Report of Pharmacy 

Report of Charity Hospital Guild 



35 



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iii 
iv 
v 
vi 
ix 
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30 
&75 

38 
IS 

46 
45a 

46 

49 

63 

51 

67 

72 

73 

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SO 

82 

85 

S7